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Goner Message Board / Food & Drink / velveeta VS cheddar
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:09 am
 
velveeta or real cheese...which is it.

i grew up on velveeta and don't know any better
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:24 am
 
Depends on what your making. Broccoli and velveeta is real good. I would like to know how to make real cheddar cheese sauce though.

I like a slice of velveeta and some Ritz crackers (I'm fancy with the Ritz). Sometimes I'll even pick that over cheddar.

Say "cheddar" a few times. Sounds funny!
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:25 am
 
Not nearly as funny as "head cheese"...
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:38 am
 
Don't you know....

There's no single cheese like Velveeta
'Cause Velveeta is more than one single cheese
Like Colby, Swiss, and Cheddar
Blended all together
For a creamy taste that melts with ease!
Velveeta processed cheese spread is so much fun
All those natural cheeses are better than one!
Velveeta really knows how to please.
You just can't stop
'Til the very last drop
There's no single cheese like Velveeta!
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:39 am
 
Velveeta=only good for rotel dip and the "Broccoli Cheese" I had for dinner with my awesome clients in the projects when her kids were returned from the State. I think it was like 2 boxes of frozen broccoli mixed up and melted with velveeta...so good.
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:39 am
 
I like a slice of velveeta and some Ritz crackers

Ooooooh, Ritz! What an aristocrat!
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:45 am
 
Fuck Ritz! Club!
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 2:47 am
 
yeah, club is the cracker of choice.
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 4:04 am
 
grilled cheese sandwiches dripping with velveeta and soggy with butter.
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 4:05 am
 
i think you have to use cream for cheese sauce...
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 4:54 am
 
You're a cracker.

And i prefer crispity-crunchity melba!!
Mmmmm....garlic-y-melba...with smelly cheese...oh boy

Oh and what they said....velveeta w/ chilis & tomato-y stuff ....
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 5:48 am
 
now if you're gettin' your nose up in the air, and you washed your smelly toes, no sense confusing stink with stank, then get you some wine and cheese, just like they did in "Sideways".

but, if you like it good and greasy, red onions in between some velveta and sliced bread, that melted cheese samich is the way to go with an ice cold Pepsi.
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 3:00 pm
 
I would like to know how to make real cheddar cheese sauce though.

Just make a basic white or bechemel (sp?) sauce, find any old standard recioe. all it is is a blonde roux (equal parts fat and flour) and milk, salt and pepper. Once the sauce is thickened to your liking, add grated cheese. This makes kick-ass macaroni and cheese. Just boil some pasta, mix with cheese sauce and bake.
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 3:36 pm
 
Just make a basic white or bechemel (sp?) sauce, find any old standard recioe. all it is is a blonde roux (equal parts fat and flour) and milk, salt and pepper. Once the sauce is thickened to your liking, add grated cheese. This makes kick-ass macaroni and cheese. Just boil some pasta, mix with cheese sauce and bake.


yeah, like that
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 11:01 pm
 
I've heard that Velveeta is actually clear until orange food coloring is added? Does anyone know if this is true or just a rumor? I don't really care either way...its still tasty
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 11:24 pm
 
Clear! That makes me laugh for some reason. I'd love to see it. I just bought a really cool old wooden box that was for Velveeta. It is the same size as the ones now, but it is made of like balsa wood and imprinted with the cutest stuff about how great Velveeta is. This older woman I work with told me that the government used to pass those out to the families in the country when she grew up and that was the only cheese she knew for years. OK Loretta Lynn...
Posted: Jan 19, 2006 11:48 pm
 
Pretty much ALL commercially-sold cheese has some sort of coloring in it. Otherwise, the color is very inconsistent and unappetizing. Usually, they use natural colorings such as annatto, which is made from seeds from the annatto tree (whatever that is.) The big companies may use artificial food colorings, though.
Posted: Jan 20, 2006 6:56 pm
 
When I fequent my neighborhood Burger King, I have the underlings place a nice slice of "asiago" that I bring myself before they place my Whopper in the microwave.I'm their FAVORITE customer!
Posted: Jan 22, 2006 7:41 pm
 
The Annatto tree or shrub can vary between 6 to 18 feet tall, with a dense rounded shape and short trunk; bark dark brown; leaves green; inflorescence with pink flowers to two inches in diameter; turning into capsule ovoid, covered with reddish-brown soft spines; seeds covered with abundant orange-red pulp. Plant lives up to about 50 years. The name of the specie was given in honor of Francisco Orellana, the conquistador, who explored the Amazon river in 1541.

The reddish-orange seeds inside a prickly heart shaped pod are crushed to obtain the orange yellow pigments bixin and norbixin as dye for the food and cosmetic industry. The part used is the dried pulp of the fruit.

The plant is a native to tropical America, possibly from the Southwest of the Amazonia. Found from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina and in the Caribbean. Today, Annatto is grown in the Philippines and Asian countries.

Annatto seeds are used in Latin America for staining food. In the Caribbean, the seeds are fried usually with fat; after discarding the
seeds, the then golden-yellow is used to fry vegetables or meat. Annatto has been used as a substitute for saffron.

The original Aztec drinking chocolate is reported to have contained annatto seeds. Using annatto to deepen the color of chocolate was common in Europe until the 17th century, and today it is used occasionally to give butter and cheese a deep yellow color.

In today's Asia, the annatto seeds are mostly used in Filipino and Vietnamese cooking, where they are used in seasonings or marinades for grilled or fried pork meats, resulting in a bright orange meat surface.

Indigenous people in many North and South American countries have used annatto seeds as body paint during festivities and also as a fabric dye. The entire plant has been used against fever and dysentery. The seeds are used against sinusitis, asthma, uteritis, constipation, and skin disorders.

The leaves have been used to color food, but in general, they will give a modestly green color. In the wild, leaf colors other than green are rare, but gardeners have succeeded in breeding cultivars with red colored leaves.

The plant adapts easily to poor acid soils. It does not tolerate too much shade but prefers full sun. The plants are susceptible to drought and low temperatures. It also accepts temporary flooding.
Posted: Jan 23, 2006 10:01 pm
 
damn

did you get that from wikipedia?
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