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Goner Message Board / ???? / New book recommendations?
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 12:30 pm
 
I need some new books. I'm into historical true crime, crime and books set in the past, and usually written in the past (1830-1950) mostly in America. No offense rest of the world, but I just feel we're more interesting reading.
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 12:43 pm
 
reading the fatal shore right now. no offense to you but very interesting book about the founding of another country
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 2:28 pm
 
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 5:39 pm | Edited by: SAMBEAUX
 
Nelson Algren? I've got some you can borrow.
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 6:06 pm
 
Only Yesterday. About the Roaring '20's. Written in 1931, but if you haven't read it yet it's new.
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 6:15 pm
 
Offense America! I'm reading Charlemagne Father of a Continent. I even shaved my chin so I could pretend to be 8th century Frankish royalty.
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 8:30 pm
 
When Men Become Gods: Mormon Polygamist Warren Jeffs, His Cult of Fear, and the Women Who Fought Back Stephen Singular

Language of Evil Robert Beattie

For the Thrill of It: Leopold, Loeb, and the Murder That Shocked Chicago Simon Baatz

American Lightning: Terror, Mystery, the Birth of Hollywood, and the Crime of the Century Howard Blum

The Man Who Made Vermeers: Unvarnishing the Legend of Master Forger Han van Meegeren Jonathan Lopez

Bloody Valentine by John Williams
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 8:31 pm
 
that charlemagne book is tops but

woodward's jim crow book and tuchman's guns of august are recent re reads and they are spectacular
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 8:36 pm
 
Thanks. I'll see if I can't check them out.
Posted: Oct 31, 2009 11:05 pm
 
Interpreter of Maladies

I had no idea it was an oprah book until just now. I usually shy away from her book list books on principle.
Posted: Nov 1, 2009 1:08 am
 
The Day Lasts More than A Hundred Years, Chingiz Aitmotov.

Not crime, not 'merican (Kyrgyz), written in 1980 (?), some history.... kicks ass.
Posted: Nov 1, 2009 3:44 pm
 
stiff: the curious lives of human cadavers
Posted: Nov 1, 2009 5:08 pm
 
Talley's Corner?
Posted: Nov 1, 2009 6:38 pm
 
stiff: the curious lives of human cadavers

That's a great book.
Posted: Nov 1, 2009 9:56 pm
 
Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson might fit the bill.
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 8:28 am
 
Housekeeping

Hmmm, I don't know. It doesn't look like the sort of thing I typically pick up.

There are a couple of classics I have to admit to never reading, but I have had my interest piqued after they both were mentioned in other books I read recently:

The House of Mirth

The Bostonians
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 11:13 am
 
crime

Have you ever read any Jim Thompson or Donald Westlake aka Richard Stark? Cool shit if you like the grit. Just to give a hint of the bad-ass sensibilities of these two - Thompson co-wrote The Killer with Stanley Kubrick and Lee Marvin played the role of Parker in Point Blank which is based on the Richard Stark novel The Hunter.
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 12:09 pm
 
Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson might fit the bill.
As I remember, that was a great book.

Currently reading First Desire by Nancy Reisman, it sounds like a bad romance novel, but it's not. Set in Buffalo NY, chronicling the life and times of a large Jewish family from about 1929-1950s. Good stuff.
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 12:48 pm
 
Lee Marvin played the role of Parker in Point Blank which is based on the Richard Stark novel The Hunter.

Loved Point Blank, so perhaps I should check out this Richard Stark guy.

That First Desire sounds like something I could handle later after Marjorie Morningstar and its incessant 1930's Manhattan Jewish American Princessness is forgotten. Have you read The Unpossessed by Tess Slesinger? That one was really good.
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 2:41 pm
 
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 3:49 pm
 
RE: Housekeeping...

It didn't really sound like something I would've picked up either, just going by the back cover description. But my cousin went to Iowa and had Robinson as a teacher and REALLY recommended I read this, so I eventually got around to it (well, not quite finished yet, but that's my own laziness getting the way). I'll admit I'm a sucker for stories set in the early days of the West Coast (Steinbeck, Kesey, Annie Dillard's "The Living," etc.), so this may be more intriguing to me than you.

Anyway, it's short.
Posted: Nov 2, 2009 4:06 pm
 
The new Andre Williams book that Norton just put out. I just got it at the store Saturday afternoon (along with the new Sun Ra reissues and Kim Fowley collections) so I only read a few paragraphs but it looks ike a real page-turner. Oh, and the new Bomp book.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 4:49 am
 
housekeeping is an astonishing, sure-handed debut; it is the least qualified book to be here re crime/past though, but now that the cat's escaped: re Bostonians and House

wharton is our greatest minor writer and mirth is her finest (by far); Bostonians is talky and (for james) overtly political, and although his portrait of olive maintains interest, it is Lily in mirth who moves.

if you want/need james (who wouldn't--our greatest prose stylist and a superb, world class novelist) go for similarly-themed portrait of a lady, a truly great book. and if you like that book and its concerns, then you can read wings of a dove, one of the 20 greatest novels ever written.


point blank is great. in both forms, but i watched orig get carter the other day and it beats boorman's film. by an inch
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 5:06 am
 
I'll admit I'm a sucker for stories set in the early days of the West Coast (Steinbeck, Kesey, Annie Dillard's "The Living," etc.), so this may be more intriguing to me than you.


you can keep steinbeck--ugh--and Dillard is better writing about creeks that run through her backyards, but other left coast fiction i like:

angels of repose
chester himes' crime novels
day of the locusts (duh)
after the dust (fante!)
big sleep (duh)
octopus (the best?)
mcteague
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 5:33 am
 
"neddy" by neddy smith, aussie crime kingpin who ran most of sydney's smack in the 70s and 80s with the help of the cops. not american but a fantastic read.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 7:32 am
 
An American Tragedy-Theodore Dreiser. An interesting period piece (1920's), which predates the true crime genre and has a lot of insight into the American pysche and social climbing.

Fante's book is "Ask the Dust", just to clarify. Great book.

All Nathaniel West is worth reading.

"They Shoot Horses, Don't They?"- Horace Mccoy. Dance marathons in the Depression.

"Fat City"- Leonard Gardiner. Boxing noir.

"Man w/ the Golden Arm" and "Walk on the Wild Side"- Nelson Algren
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 8:30 am
 
Water for Elephants
The Wettest County in the World
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 9:36 am
 
In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex - it's got cannibalism!

Caught in the Middle: America's Heartland in the Age of Globalism by Richard C. Longworth - this dude has the balls to call small, failing, white-majority mid-western cities "slums", which they are, but which nobody will admit to. I'd call the author an "apologist" for globalism, except he doesn't make any apologies, he basically says "This is the way things are now, and it's going to suck for people who got used to how they used to be." Pretty bleak reading, but good.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 11:03 am
 
How about that evil genius Fantomas? Not American but still fucking awesome. I just reread the first book. Root for evil!

URL
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 11:14 am
 
I've got In The Heart of the Sea if you want to borrow it.
Night of the Gun is turning out to be fantastic.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 11:55 am
 
Fante's book is "Ask the Dust", just to clarify. Great book.
One of my favorites.

"Fat City"- Leonard Gardiner. Boxing noir.
Also a great movie. Stacey Keach!

"Man w/ the Golden Arm" and "Walk on the Wild Side"- Nelson Algren
Also great. I really his book-length essay "Nonconformity."
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 1:46 pm
 
"Man w/ the Golden Arm"

interesting movie as well. Frank Sinatra as a ruthless junkie. Cool jazz score.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 5:57 pm | Edited by: The Driver
 
Denis Johnson's Nobody Move - minimal, modern noir, comparable to Cormac McCarthy's No Country For Old Men (ie. established A-list writers having some fun with genre fiction)
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 6:00 pm
 
Also, Last Carousel by Algren, set in New Orleans.
Texas Stories is good too, set in Texas.
Posted: Nov 3, 2009 6:07 pm
 
devil born without horns, micheal lucas
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 9:22 am
 
An American Tragedy-Theodore Dreiser. An interesting period piece (1920's), which predates the true crime genre and has a lot of insight into the American pysche and social climbing.
One of my favorite books and writers ever, though his Sister Carrie is in my Top 3 (with McTeague--my #1--and Great Gatsby).


"They Shoot Horses, Don't They?"- Horace Mccoy. Dance marathons in the Depression.
On my DVR, but will look for the book too.

I've never read Nelson Algren, but loved Man with the Golden Arm, the film and Sinatra in that era.

I got a stack of new stuff from wire the other night (thanks David!), have about 50 more pages of Marjorie Morningstar and I also have yet to read the Holly Goddard Jones book of short stories (one of my new favorite writers). I also bought this book, Unwise Passions, by Alan Pell Crawford about a 18th century American infanticide in a wealthy Virginia tobacco family.
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 9:24 am
 
Night of the Gun is turning out to be fantastic.

Tolja! Just try to empathize with the guy when he gets sober. I mean, it isn't that hard because he got to be such a total and pathetic wreck that it is incredible he is alive.
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 2:28 pm
 
2666...I said I wouldn't read it, but I did(am?)...great up until the last "part", and now I'm totally lost and ready to move on...only 200 pages to go....
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 6:36 pm
 
2666...I said I wouldn't read it, but I did(am?)...great up until the last "part", and now I'm totally lost and ready to move on...only 200 pages to go....

The fairy tale stuff in the beginning is hard to take after the Part about the Crimes, but keep going: the last part is the best.
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 7:59 pm
 
Then Again, Maybe I Won't.
The House with the Clock in the Walls
The Headless Cupid

Where the Red Fern Goes
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 8:55 pm | Edited by: SSSSSSS
 
Where the Red Fern Goes
I saw that in the drive-in as a yute in NC. The 2003 version is on Netflix Watch Instantly, I've almost clicked on it a couple times, but I really don't think I can watch it.

Hey Saispas, you ever read Pop. 1280? Awesome book. Pretty short, tho. One night read.
Posted: Nov 4, 2009 11:45 pm
 
2666 is staring me down from my shelf. But The Savage Detectives was one of the best novels I've read in years. Not sure what's keeping me away from the new one.
Posted: Nov 5, 2009 12:02 am
 
John Irving has a new one but I haven't gotten my hands on it yet.
Posted: Nov 5, 2009 7:11 am
 
The fairy tale stuff in the beginning is hard to take after the Part about the Crimes

exactly! that's where I'm getting bogged down...
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