Goner Message Board
 | Forums | Register | Reply | Search | Statistics | Manual |
Goner Message Board / ???? / Dog behavioralists out there? Advice please!
Posted: Sep 4, 2009 6:00 pm
 
Our dog totally freaks out when anyone tries to cut her nails. I took her to the vet today to have it done and they refused because they were afraid she was going to have a heart attack when they tried to do it. I'm betting that when she was picked up off the Memphis streets last year and taken to the Shelter, they likely cut the quicks or something because she goes from sweet and loving to terrified if someone touches her paws and she sees a set of clippers.

The vet doesn't think it would be safe (at this point) unless she was konked out which would be over $50! Um, no. Does anyone have any suggestions to get her gradually adjusted to this or are there different sorts of clippers that wouldn't be so harsh?
Posted: Sep 4, 2009 6:07 pm
 
Rub her paws and tell her you're just cutting the tips. And just cut off the tips. She probably got her nails cut on the part that hurts and freaked out.
Posted: Sep 4, 2009 6:16 pm
 
Take her on walks on pavement a lot and that might wear them down some.
Also, I have a nervous dog, and rubbing lavender on her midsection and a little behind the ears calms her down,may or may not help, but it couldn't hurt to try.
Posted: Sep 4, 2009 10:27 pm
 
when dogs are a puppy you touch the paws and give a treat and tell then how great they are (with everything) pull the ear. tiny treat. good.
Now, that doesn't help you with this dog. But take a small container that you would put salad dressing in and put plain yogurt and some honey. Then freeze it to make a little home made frosty paws ice cream.
That might help distract the dog, but with back up. Have someone hold the dog and the cup of icecream, while you clip. If you get one done and it seems really bad, just stop. Praise and then try again another day.
Walking can help wear them down, but not every dog.
There are some meds you can get at a better dog food store that you might try also. A combo of getting the dog tired, then a little meds and ice cream might do the trick.
If she has dark nails then yeah someone might have really hurt her and it might be a lost cause.
good luck.
Posted: Sep 4, 2009 11:20 pm
 
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 8:52 am
 
Those things suck.
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 10:04 am
 
There's this thing...

Scott's right, they suck, they end up getting really really hot from the friction and the dog recoils from it because its fucking hot...
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 11:03 am
 
Thanks all--yeah, I won't be getting that PediPaws though I was tempted!

ida and riggler--yep, her claws are black and you know the animal shelters, prisoners and kids work at those places and while they can be well-meaning, they aren't always the most patient of human beings. They had to have made them bleed like mad. I've seen it happen to cats and it is AWFUL.

My vet suggested melatonin--3 mgs a day--also. We always wear her out playing frisbee so maybe that, plus melatonin, plus her benadryl, plus this crazy ice cream, plus the concrete walks will help!
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 1:19 pm
 
OK, this melatonin stuff DOES calm dogs down! I'd suggest it in the evenings because Roo caught one frisbee and is now completely zoning out, not even going after numerous squirrels in the backyard. This is very abnormal for this dog!
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 2:37 pm
 
hm. might have to try the melatonin
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 2:57 pm
 
Well, a couple of hours is what 3 mgs will take care of now that we're here and the crazed chasing of squirrels and following around slapping my legs with a Kong frisbee is again the norm.
Posted: Sep 5, 2009 3:12 pm
 
i bet valerian would work as well or maybe give roo some of your zoloft.
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 10:37 am
 
i think most/all dogs freak out when it comes to nail-clipping.

i have an approx 14-year old dog who hates it. but with a little reassurance & some decisive/quick cutting i can usually do 3-5 nails before she revolts. her yelps right in my ear make me revolt after awhile, too.

she's also a rescue dog, so i sympathize. it's hard to know what a dog's thinking/feeling/experienced when you weren't around for some/part/much of their past.
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 12:30 pm
 
i bet valerian would work as well or maybe give roo some of your zoloft.

Man, that shit don't even work. SSRIs suck. That is what Portland PCP's dole out to everyone that gets Seasonal Affective Disorder...and I sure as hell did!
Sun=Improved mood and the SSRIs were not a handy substitute for that.

Roo is on 3 mgs of the melatonin and it seems to definitely chill her out. However, I bet she'll freak when she sees the clippers again!
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 3:00 pm
 
JOKES! seriously though, try valerian. probably konk that dog right out.
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 3:59 pm
 
Our rescued border collie actually bit the groomer when I took him there for a hair and nail cut- thank god she's a sweet old lady or we probably would've gotten sued. I will try melatonin- he has so many neuroses I'm not even sure what to do with him anymore. He's afraid of the dishwasher, haircuts, the ice maker, the front door when it squeaks open...the list goes on. Lord only knows what happened to that dog before he was rescued from the side of the highway.
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 6:48 pm
 
if you are going to give your dog valerian make sure you know how to do the dose.
Posted: Sep 8, 2009 9:40 pm
 
have you called these guys?
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 12:25 pm
 
The Dog Police are too busy trying to locate a Cordova fern bar to worry about my doggie head case.

Roo has also become even MORE crazy when other people come around. She barks, wiggles like mad, jumps on them...it sucks. Time for Doggy Obedience School, baby!
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 12:43 pm
 
I can't help much with the clipping issue -- Mingo had similar issues, but the women at PetCo on Pop/Highland were great with him.

but here's my two cents on basic dog training:

I got a new rescue shortly after you got Roo, and training him is definitely a work in progress. a friend gave me one of the Dog Whisperer's DVDs, and it really, really helped me. with Beulah, my last dog, I would wait until a situation escalated and then I would yell to fix it. this time around, I anticipate what's going to happen and then I take control of the situation by asking Cassius for the behavior I want -- i.e. setting him up for success. I also don't yell -- instead I talk very quietly, and wait for him to behave, and don't let anything else progress (the walk, the person coming in the front door, dinner, whatever) until he's done what I've asked. I also make those silly shhht correction noises when he starts to veer off track. so far, it works great and only fails when I fail to address a situation before it gets to the breaking point (i.e. when he jumps on company while they're sitting on the couch etc).

like when other people come around, tell them to stop and turn their back on Roo as soon as she starts to get excited. when she can sit or lie down, they can acknowledge her, but as soon as she gets wriggly again, they quit talking, turn their back, and you correct her back into place. it takes a lot of repetition, and it can be annoying at first, but your visitors shouldn't mind helping and in the long run you, Roo and Ryan will be happier for it!
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 6:56 pm
 
I really don't want to start a big Dog Whisperer conversation, but really pinning your dog down and forcing it on its back is really confusing and creates fear in most dogs. I guess don't believe everything that guy says.
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 7:31 pm
 
i'm 80 pages into "how dogs think". i still have awhile before i reach the training-type stuff. and i'm not one of those terrorists who reads chapters out of order.
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:01 pm
 
pinning your dog down and forcing it on its back

never done that. the main thing i took from the DW DVD was positive reinforcement when the dog is behaving the way you want him to, coupled with making an advanced assessment of how a situation might turn out and engaging the dog before he gets out of control.

i.e. when we're on a walk, and i see a jogger coming our way, I ask my dog to sit or even lay down before the jogger gets close enough for him to get excited. i talk to him in a low, friendly voice until the jogger is past, and then we go on our walk. it's much better than waiting until he's already trying to leap all over the person and then screaming at him to stop!

he's a big 70-lb pit mix, and when we first started walking, he would lunge every which way. so I started standing still until he would calm down and sit at my right side. the first week, we could barely get off my front porch in under 45 minutes. now he walks like a pro, although I still get him to pause and sit on every street corner we cross, so I can make sure he's paying attention and under control.

Cassius was similar to Franny's rescue in some ways -- he had major fear of manhole covers and sewer drains, and all kinds of noises in the home.

so before I turned on the dishwasher, I would call him into the kitchen and ask him to sit (not too close to the dishwasher, but where he could see and hear it) and then give him a treat. then i would lock the dishwasher and make sure he's still sitting and give him another lil treat. then I would take out a treat and keep telling him what a good, sweet boy he is, and put my other hand on the dishwasher control, and turn it on. if he panicked, i didn't try to block him or anything, but I would keep talking to him in a low, gentle voice, and guide him back into a sit for the final treat. He learned that the dishwasher is noisy but nothing to fear. same thing with the manhole covers outside. now he won't quite sit ON one, but will sit right next to it and even lay down for his treat, which was totally unfeasible 6 months ago.
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:07 pm
 
Yeah, what's up with that dishwasher? My piece of shit can't stand the dry cycle and all it does is tick. I can't wait for her to die.
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:08 pm
 
In a nice, peaceful sort of way, of course. Then I can vacuum the ductwork.
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:10 pm
 
Setting up for success is the way to go though. That equates to structure, repetition, ritual. Dogs, like children, want/need ritual. Think WICKERMAN!
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:10 pm
 
WhatevARRFF!
Posted: Sep 9, 2009 11:23 pm
 
Just trimmed a few nails on the dog - very, very dark. How long are Roo's? If they're really long, it's easy to spot the area where the quick isn't - there's sort of a structure underneath the main nail that doesn't extend the full length of the nail.
Posted: Sep 10, 2009 1:58 am
 
making an advanced assessment of how a situation might turn out and engaging the dog before he gets out of control.

he's a big 70-lb pit mix
i've done this since mine was a puppy. he's seven now and the only thing he really goes after are cats, but now he usually stops when i call, which never ever happened before. it seems like pit bulls are pretty predictable with their behavior so i can anticipate how he will react to most situations. he's turned out to be pretty mellow and doesn't take much to get him to obey in situations he hasn't encountered before.
Posted: Sep 10, 2009 11:37 am
 
I think I can tell where the quick "isn't" from what you're saying, Wire. They are pretty long! Basically if I can nip off those little curled tips where the structure isn't, I'm good. I've been holding her paws and petting her simultaneously and even when she starts trying to pull them away/lick my hands, I keep holding and praising her.

I think I need to be the one to clip while Ryan holds her. We may get through one mitt a day, but whatever!

Andria--Roo responds to those "shht" things too! I guess I am a "yeller" so I have to train myself too. I've been trying the "ignore when wiggly" thing again this week as it tends to work; but it is sooooooo annoying before she gets the idea and is wiggling all over, jumping on every available piece of furniture, barking, scaring the cats...jeeeezzzzzussss, I just got off I-240 at rush hour, dawg.
Posted: Sep 10, 2009 12:42 pm
 
so before I turned on the dishwasher, I would call him into the kitchen and ask him to sit (not too close to the dishwasher, but where he could see and hear it) and then give him a treat. then i would lock the dishwasher and make sure he's still sitting and give him another lil treat. then I would take out a treat and keep telling him what a good, sweet boy he is, and put my other hand on the dishwasher control, and turn it on. if he panicked, i didn't try to block him or anything, but I would keep talking to him in a low, gentle voice, and guide him back into a sit for the final treat.

yeah, unfortunately that didn't work- I've tried it several times and he looks like he's so scared that he's about to shit himself and then he slinks away. The frightening thing is that he gets worse the older he gets. I've taken to putting on the 4 hour delay on the washer and making sure it runs in the middle of the night when he's hopefully asleep.
Posted: Oct 29, 2009 8:41 pm
 
Whoa.
I just trimmed Scout's nails.
One was too far, deep into the quick.
She didn't jerk away, didn't snap, didn't make a sound.
I saw the blood a moment later and applied the styptic powder.
She wasn't reacting at all (she licked at the nail, but no whining, cringing, etc), so I just cleaned up, scratched her head, talked to her.
Top
Your Reply Click this icon to move up to the quoted message
 

 
Only registered users are allowed to post here. Please, enter your username/password details upon posting a message, or register first.

 
  Goner Message Board Powered by PHP Forum Software miniBB ®