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Goner Message Board / ???? / Turntable H E L P
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:16 pm
 
So, I just bought my first grown up stereo system. I've got it set up and running all right- but whenever I get the volume up to proper rockin' level I get that feedback hum through the turntable. Anybody fought this demon and won? Any pointers?
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:19 pm
 
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:20 pm
 
If your setup is in a bedroom or spare room in your house you may be limited by other furniture or room uses. The following advice will help you to get the best out of your setup.

Try to place your decks and mixer in the centre of the longest wall. You will now have plenty of room for your records and you can hopefully fit any other furniture around this setup. The height of the decks should allow you to comfortably reach all the controls without your back being bent. If you are using a low table try placing something under the legs to bring it up to the required height.

The speakers need to be ideally at head height mounted on stands or on wall brackets. They should be directly in front of you facing towards the center of the room. A separation of approx. 1 - 2 metres is normal. This will allow you to hear the music without any delays. The next problem will be reflected sound. When you are mixing it is important that you hear the sound from the speakers without any reflected sound (this will cause confusion when synchronizing and will mess up your mix), to achieve this the simplest method is to hang a curtain or other piece of material on the rear wall. This will absorb the sound and deaden any reflections.

Short and sweet. For optimum system performance, it is recommended that you keep all signal and speaker cabling as short as possible. If all your system components, such as your mixer, amplifier, equalizer and etc., are rack mounted, buy the shortest hookup cables you can that will fit the task. Purchase quality cables with good shielding and gold contacts. This will provide optimum signal quality and added protection from radio frequency interference (RFI). Likewise, try to keep your speaker cabling as short as possible. Long cable runs add additional load resistance and can make your amplifier work harder than necessary. For the best results, use multiple length speaker cables so you can select the length you need as opposed to using one long set of cables for every job. Noise and feedback. Unwanted feedback, in addition to clearing the dance floor, can result in damage to speaker components. Mic feedback, one of the most common, occurs when a mic picks up audio signals from speaker which are then amplified and redistributed causing a loud "howling" sound. Turntable feedback occurs when a turntable is placed too closed to a speaker also resulting in a loud "howling" sound when a record is played. To help eliminate mic feedback, try positioning the speakers so that they are not firing directly into the mic. In addition, use some type of feedback cancellation device such as a equalizer or notch filtering. Many DJ mixers today offer graphic equalization enabling you to filter out unwanted feedback. In the case of turntable feedback, try locating your turntables as far away from your speakers as possible. You can also help reduce feedback potential by placing your turntables on top of two-inch thick foam rubber. There are also a number of turntable isolation devices available on the market designed to help eliminate turntable feedback. Before making any purchase, see if you can try out the system in the store using your turntables.


from http://www.reform-records.co.uk/acatalog/Hints_and_Tips.html
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:22 pm
 
i know above speaks to mixing but proximity of certain components will cause hum at times as he/she mentions

i know i know: no way a girl would waste her time on this...
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:22 pm
 
It's not an electrical hum- just a feedback from the vibrations from the speakers finding their way into the tonearm (I think)
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:24 pm
 
aim the speakers at yr neighbor's house and open the windows and put on reigning sounds' guitar LP
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:26 pm
 
done!
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 9:52 pm
 
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 10:00 pm
 
I wish I had a sexy little redheaded neighbor
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 11:21 pm
 
turn down the bass. get a better turntable. put it on a concrete floor.
Posted: Nov 26, 2008 11:50 pm
 
If your setup is in a bedroom or spare room in your house you may be limited by other furniture or room uses. The following advice will help you to get the best out of your setup.

Try to place your decks and mixer in the centre of the longest wall. You will now have plenty of room for your records and you can hopefully fit any other furniture around this setup. The height of the decks should allow you to comfortably reach all the controls without your back being bent. If you are using a low table try placing something under the legs to bring it up to the required height.

The speakers need to be ideally at head height mounted on stands or on wall brackets. They should be directly in front of you facing towards the center of the room. A separation of approx. 1 - 2 metres is normal. This will allow you to hear the music without any delays. The next problem will be reflected sound. When you are mixing it is important that you hear the sound from the speakers without any reflected sound (this will cause confusion when synchronizing and will mess up your mix), to achieve this the simplest method is to hang a curtain or other piece of material on the rear wall. This will absorb the sound and deaden any reflections.

Short and sweet. For optimum system performance, it is recommended that you keep all signal and speaker cabling as short as possible. If all your system components, such as your mixer, amplifier, equalizer and etc., are rack mounted, buy the shortest hookup cables you can that will fit the task. Purchase quality cables with good shielding and gold contacts. This will provide optimum signal quality and added protection from radio frequency interference (RFI). Likewise, try to keep your speaker cabling as short as possible. Long cable runs add additional load resistance and can make your amplifier work harder than necessary. For the best results, use multiple length speaker cables so you can select the length you need as opposed to using one long set of cables for every job. Noise and feedback. Unwanted feedback, in addition to clearing the dance floor, can result in damage to speaker components. Mic feedback, one of the most common, occurs when a mic picks up audio signals from speaker which are then amplified and redistributed causing a loud "howling" sound. Turntable feedback occurs when a turntable is placed too closed to a speaker also resulting in a loud "howling" sound when a record is played. To help eliminate mic feedback, try positioning the speakers so that they are not firing directly into the mic. In addition, use some type of feedback cancellation device such as a equalizer or notch filtering. Many DJ mixers today offer graphic equalization enabling you to filter out unwanted feedback. In the case of turntable feedback, try locating your turntables as far away from your speakers as possible. You can also help reduce feedback potential by placing your turntables on top of two-inch thick foam rubber. There are also a number of turntable isolation devices available on the market designed to help eliminate turntable feedback. Before making any purchase, see if you can try out the system in the store using your turntables.


once again THE ANTI-DONKEY strikes again!
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 1:05 am
 
It's not an electrical hum- just a feedback from the vibrations from the speakers finding their way into the tonearm (I think)

Yes. The speakers are vibrating your table and fucking shit up. Are your speakers on the same surface as your turntable? Is your table sitting on your speakers? Separate those fuckers so the sympathetic standing nega-rays can't diddle your gritz. WERD.
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 2:40 am
 
most likely its comin from the tone arm...yea..try puttin it on the floor..or away from the speakers..or you can spend a cool grand on some "hi-end" stuff... but who the fuck has that kinda money nowadays.
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 2:54 pm
 
here's entirely too many words on the subject:

http://www.tnt-audio.com/accessories/vibra_iso_pt1_e.html
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 2:54 pm
 
and some reviews of products likely designed to divorce you from your moneys:

http://www.enjoythemusic.com/Magazine/equipment/1203/isolationshootout .htm
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 6:09 pm
 
Did you ground the turntable?
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 6:22 pm
 
get one of these
Posted: Nov 27, 2008 6:29 pm
 
Okay- I got it! Moving it a few feet seemed to help. Thanks heroes!
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