Goner Message Board
 | Forums | Register | Reply | Search | Statistics | Manual |
Goner Message Board / ???? / Kind of freakish short stories for kids
Posted: Mar 19, 2008 11:46 pm
 
When I did some bored wandering around the Internet after learning about Aurthur C. Clarke, I stumbled on a Ray Bradbury short story I hadn't seen since grade school: "All Summer In A Day".
I got to thinkuing:
My kid is really reading a lot lately, and I'm going to go to the used book store and pick him up a bunch of short story collections. He doesn't have to read 'em right away, but I want to put a collection together for him.
Obvious ones are Poe, Saki and O. Henry.

What are some short stories that freaked you out / blew your little mind as a kid?
Posted: Mar 19, 2008 11:53 pm
 
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 2:00 am
 
"All summer in a day" really bummed me out as a kid.

Ghost stories are great!
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 2:09 am
 
john steinbeck
the affair at 7 rue d M
http://www.violetbooks.com/REVIEWS/rbadac-steinbeck.html
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 2:36 am
 
kurt vonnegut - welcome to the monkey house
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 3:03 am
 
I just remembered!
Those are Roald Dahl's favorite ghost stories, a collection, mostly women authors...because Roald felt women wrote better short stories...or somethin'.
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 12:05 pm
 
All summer in a day

i remember watching the adaptation on Wonder Works (go Canada) as a kid on channel 11.

that kid was an asshole.

part 1

part 2

part 3
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 12:09 pm
 
Roald Dahl, Ghost Stories

http://www.amazon.com/Roald-Dahls-Book-Ghost-Stories/dp/0374518688



One of my favorite books to give as a gift!
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 12:47 pm
 
hawthorne still freaks me out.
and buy him the collected short stories of hemingway
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 4:54 pm
 
Those old Alfred Hitchcock story comps for kids are pretty good, if you can find 'em

I think there's two
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 5:06 pm
 
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 5:09 pm | Edited by: Donkey
 
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 5:17 pm
 
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 5:24 pm
 
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 5:55 pm
 
i read a bunch of twilight zone stories as a kid, about eight or ten i guess. fucked with me good and proper.
Posted: Mar 20, 2008 11:47 pm
 
Dahl for sure.

Not short stories really but the Shel Silverstein stuff is cool...even for poetry.

I'm wondering what is the proper age I should land Catcher In The Rye my oldest. I was 12 when I read it first time. He's turning twelve in August...
Posted: Mar 21, 2008 12:16 am
 
man, Catcher in the Rye is the worst. Fuck that book and that whiny prick. I never got what was so great about that kid's dissent, it's just like duh.

big second to Hawthorne

Ambrose Bierce, try In the Midst of Life (it's all weird tales set during the Civil War)

Lovecraft, there is a four book set of all of his short stuff that Arkham House put out

Theodore Sturgeon, I think he has a three or four book set too of short stories, it's all sorts of 20s, 30s and 40s sci-fi and weird stories. He wrote Killdozer! the inspiration for the name of the band, which predates Maximum Overdrive by half a century

Kenzaburo Oe's the Catch and other War Stories, stories about WWII from the Japanese side, which makes them pretty strange, they're also pretty anti-war from what I remember

I really like this Bradbury book I read about 30s Hollywood, I forget what it was called. Not sci-fi or horror, just historical fiction, but it evoked a pretty cool nostalgia for a time I'd never thought about before.
Posted: Mar 21, 2008 12:32 am
 
Thx doodz.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 9:41 am
 
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 10:41 am
 
man, Catcher in the Rye is the worst. Fuck that book and that whiny prick. I never got what was so great about that kid's dissent, it's just like duh.

big second to Hawthorne

Ambrose Bierce, try In the Midst of Life (it's all weird tales set during the Civil War)



I like you.
I want to kiss you always!
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 12:51 pm | Edited by: elle
 
Kenzaburo Oe's the Catch and other War Stories, stories about WWII from the Japanese side, which makes them pretty strange, they're also pretty anti-war from what I remember

YES. those are GREAT.

edogawa rampo - the edgar allen poe of japan is great too. this one about a mirror ball is great. read it in a japanese science fiction class that i took at indiana.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 1:07 pm
 
Kenzaburo Oe's the Catch and other War Stories, stories about WWII from the Japanese side, which makes them pretty strange, they're also pretty anti-war from what I remember



his son is 11 and Hemingway seems a little mature as well; then again you hate catcher


why not the obvious:
poe
tom sawyer
narnia stuff
se hinton
wizard of oz


i dunno--i'm in between this: i have a smart 5 year old and i teach adolescent lit but through english majors' eyes, so hard for me to "see" what is great for young boy


i LOVED sports biographies at that age and whatever whodunits that brad, i mean donkey, said are worth hunting out
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 1:16 pm
 
Didn't Roald Dahl write some book called, like, "Scary Stories for Grownups" or something? I'm sure the title was more whimsical, but I distinctly remember it being scary as fuck. My dad read it to us during camping trips to Alvord Desert. Sorta fucked up, now that I think about it.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 1:18 pm
 
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 1:23 pm
 
Baker, goddammit!

HUCK FINN!!!
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 1:24 pm
 
The one I'm thinking of is called "Tales of the Unexpected." Creepy as shit.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 2:03 pm
 
What are some short stories that freaked you out / blew your little mind as a kid?

Dear Penthouse Forum...
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 2:40 pm
 
Baker, goddammit!

HUCK FINN!!!




i'm tepid about twain: huck is only thing (with his journalsim) that ranks as world class. once again you show offs, i was thinking of the thread, of jack's request, of the needs of a child. huck ain't for 12 year olds. maybe the plot. maybe the characterization. maybe the diction. but not the tone and certainly not Twain's ambivalent, ambiguous relationship to Nigger Jim.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:01 pm
 
i'm tepid about twain

Yeah, I'm totally tepid about him too.
But the first half of his Life On The Mississippi is also brilliant.

If the kid is 12 years old, than Tow Saywer will put him to sleep, or ought to.
Huck Finn can be read as a collection of stories by a kid, (hell, while we're drifting: even Moby Dick could; he would skip the 'I am not aware of the fact that I am very, VERY drunk' parts just like adults do).

Speaking of the thread, I wouldn't suggest Poe for kids. If they discover him, and like him, cool, but giving it to a kid? I wouldn't. That's some seriously fucked up stuff. I love Poe. But if my mum's not kidding, I just finished puberty, so I should be able to deal with him.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:02 pm
 
o fuck all those typo's.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:11 pm | Edited by: michael baker
 
i'm borderline about poe and child; on one hand i think of the geniuses Charles addams and E Gorey and Stanislaw Lem and Nabokov and KNOW they had to be immersed in him and obvioulsy in a non academic setting: as children, in bed, scared shitless.

but the buried alive and heavy breathing doppelgangers are tough on 12-16 yr olds. i totally agree.

but: the poems? the Dupin detective stories?

in moby--dick i would pause where the "seamen" collaboratively ooze the "Sperm" whale's product through their collected and trembling fingers.


and i need a dictionary when i read MD!!!

back to yr ironing, Misssssss Spangle.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:15 pm
 
and i need a dictionary when i read MD!!!


just kidding you fucking fuckers: but a kid would--

random page (108)

For many years past the whale-ship has been the pioneer in ferreting out the remotest and least known parts of the earth. She has explored seas and archipelagoes which had no chart, where no Cook or Vancouver had ever sailed. If American and european men-of-war now peacefully ride in once savage harbors, let them fire salutes to the honor and glory of the whale-ship, which originally showed them the way, and first interpreted between them and the savages. They may celebrate as they will the heroes of Exploring Expeditions, your Cookes, Your Krusensterns; but I say that scores of anonymous Captains have sailed out of Nantucket, that were as great, and greater than your Cooke and your Krusenstern. For in their succorless emptyhandedness, they, in the heathenish sharked waters, and by the beaches of unrecorded, javelin islands, battled with virgin wonders and terrors that Cooke with all his marines and muskets would not willingly have dared. All that is made such a flourish of in the old South Sea Voyages, those things were but the lifetime commonplaces of our heroic Nantucketers. Often, adventures which Vancouver dedicates three chapters to, these men accounted unworthy of being set down in the ship's common log. Ah, the world! Oh, the world!

Until the whale fishery rounded Cape Horn, no commerce but colonial, scarcely any intercourse but colonial, was carried on between Europe and the long line of the opulent Spanish provinces on the Pacific coast. It was the whaleman who first broke through the jealous policy of the Spanish crown, touching those colonies; and, if space permitted, it might be distinctly shown how from those whalemen at last eventuated the liberation of Peru, Chili, and Bolivia from the yoke of Old Spain, and the establishment of the eternal democracy in those parts.

That great America on the other side of the sphere, Australia, was given to the enlightened world by the whaleman. After its first blunder-born discovery by a Dutchman, all other ships long shunned those shores as pestiferously barbarous; but the whale-ship touched there. The whale-ship is the true mother of that now mighty colony. Moreover, in the infancy of the first Australian settlement, the emigrants were several times saved
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:19 pm
 
very, VERY drunk
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:19 pm
 
I love Poe.
Bray!
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:21 pm
 
the geniuses Charles addams and E Gorey and Stanislaw Lem and Nabokov

Their minds were fed on different stuff, they had totally different guts as a kid.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:24 pm
 
the poems

I dunno man. They scary.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:24 pm
 
Their minds were fed on different stuff


poe had to be in that stew
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:27 pm
 
pym is poe's masterpiece by the way; i like william wilson and the detective stories a lot too



but i'm busy

listening to horace andy
bacharach box
world musette lae primitifs du future
kaleidoscope bernice
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:27 pm
 
Their minds were fed on different stuff


poe had to be in that stew


Yeah, it gave Nabokov his clue to Lolita. Took a while to sink in, but it did.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 3:28 pm
 
but i'm busy

Ha!
Top
Your Reply Click this icon to move up to the quoted message
 

 
Only registered users are allowed to post here. Please, enter your username/password details upon posting a message, or register first.

 
  Goner Message Board Powered by PHP Forum Software miniBB ®