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Goner Message Board / ???? / The older I get, the more I appreciate Country
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 6:22 pm
 
- that one took a while. I even passed on Creedence first time around - too Country for this boy. Then one day you wake up and realize all those trailer park dramas they've been singing about are your life.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 8:03 pm
 
Creedence rules.....beats the shit outta the fucking Beatles...
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 8:54 pm | Edited by: dale
 
Been listening to a shitload of Waylon lately (again). At work they listen to the country station a lot. I cringed at first because a lot of that young country shit is no different than 80's pop but then realized that things like guitar solos and melody lines are more important to that kind of music than say what the hell is on top 40. A lot of it is more Rock-n-roll sounding too. I was raised on a lot of country music. Turned my back to it in my teens except for rare occasions and though it's still not my first music of choice I'd rather listen to it than most of what else is on the charts these days.

The ironic part is I was actually thinking about starting a thread like this...Looks like I was beaten to it.

And yes Creedenc DOES RULE!
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:05 pm | Edited by: rich riggler
 
One of the greatest shows I ever seen was June Carter (and Johnny Cash) at The Bottom Line after her solo CD came out. She had Mother Maybelle's old Gibson guitar on stage. It's amazing to think that country essentially started on the same day in Bristol, TN when Jimmy Rogers and The Carter Family made their first recordings. They used to sell a million copies of each record during the depression (when they weren't making many records which explains what happened to all the country blues artists) and there were only about 10,000 record players in America. People bought them just to put on the mantle because of what they represented. Johnny Cash's American recordings beat the crap out of anything else being made at the time, too. There are many talented artists in Country music who just don't know what to do (and some who do like Marty Stuart and his new Bluegrass band The Fabulous Superlatives who get shunned when they get too authentic). If you haven't got The Smithsonian Anthology of American Folk Music Box Set or whatever it's called, GET IT. Essential.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:14 pm
 
Johnny Cash's American recordings

It's hard to believe the Man in Black could get so pretentious.
Fat boy's contribution sullied the legend.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:16 pm
 
totally agree on the country. ccr i always liked.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:41 pm
 
Marty Stuart and his new Bluegrass band The Fabulous Superlatives

I saw the band over the summer and they were awesome. Marty's a damn cool guy too (he hung out, signed autographs and answered question for at least an hour after the show). Also saw Jr Brown over the summer too. It was okay but he just seems to call it in on stage and was kind of an ass during the meet-n-greet (though his bandmates had some pretty damn good weed). Shit, I saw more country shows than rock-n-roll bands in 2007.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:45 pm
 
buck owens!
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 9:48 pm | Edited by: Alisa
 
Hi Driver!
How's the Princess?
First two records I ever got were Hank Snow and Meet the Beatles.
I'm covered.

Also, it's not "country" but find that Bobbie Gentry record. Rules.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:23 pm
 
I gave my dad the new Merle Haggard "The Bluegrass Sessions" and the new Levon Helm "Dirt Farmer" for Christmas. Good shit. Might have to buy 'em myself. Marty Stuart's on the Merle album.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:43 pm
 
i never had a bone to pick w/ country
real country and country/western music has so many treasures, hidden and highly visible
some of the best and most enduring artists, performers, etc come from that fold - Johnny & June, Hank, Waylon... people so renown they just need first names

but there was a nasty phase in nashville - i call it the Barbara Mandrellization - in the 80s you couldn't escape the whole NashVegas identity... and i think for loads of people in the generation age-wise after mine... that put a big stank on what was perceived as "country"
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:44 pm
 
been digitizing pre-war country 78s all day...getting into it...N.T. Narmour and S.W. Smith, the Cartwright Bros, Jimmie Rogers and the Three Southerners...good shit...
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:47 pm
 
I listen to more country these days than anything else. Used country LP's are plentiful and cheap, especially stuff from the 70's. I've been getting very into Charlie Rich lately. And Donna Fargo and Jessi Colter (Waylon's wife.) Listen to "The Happiest Girl in the Whole USA" back to back with "I'm Not Lisa" and be amazed.

Speaking of Waylon and Jessi, has anyone heard much by their son, Shooter Jennings? I saw a video of one of his songs and I wasn't into it. It was a slightly more authentic version of Kid Rock's more "southern rock" efforts.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:54 pm | Edited by: JJ Champion
 
Shooter Jennings?

Fact: he's got a kid with Drea de Matteo, who played Adriana on The Sporanos.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 10:56 pm
 
Johnny Cash's American recordings

It's hard to believe the Man in Black could get so pretentious.
Fat boy's contribution sullied the legend.


i still can't figure out what this means
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:10 pm
 
Listen to "The Happiest Girl in the Whole USA" back to back with "I'm Not Lisa" and be amazed.

You have the greatest taste in everything! From food to country music!

My mother played "I'm Not Lisa" over and over when I was a child (she also had a dead neice named Julie) and it creeped me out big time. But, I appreciated it.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:29 pm
 
but there was a nasty phase in nashville - i call it the Barbara Mandrellization - in the 80s

It goes back farther than that to Chet Atkins and Owen Bradley when they decided that country music needed to be sophisticated and appeal to "city folk." Some of those productions are brilliant and timeless but it did plant the seeds to the adult contemporary music that country became in the 80's.

Speaking of Waylon and Jessi, has anyone heard much by their son, Shooter Jennings?

The Shooter albums can be kinda of spotty, and his voice isn't all that good (esp. considering who his folks are) but he's much more convincing as a scruffy country guy than HankIII (who's country stuff sounds sarcastic and contrived...just like his "punk" stuff. Fuck a Hank III.)
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:32 pm
 
has anyone heard much by their son, Shooter Jennings? I saw a video of one of his songs and I wasn't into it

Shooters kind of hit or miss. "4th. of July" is one of the better country songs of the past few years and "Aviators" just sounds damn beautiful.
I have not heard all of the new album( The Wolf) but his version of "Walk of Life" sucked it hard.

I encourage people to listen to Jim Lauderdale and Dale Watson. They both consistently put out good records.

Marty Stuart and his new Bluegrass band The Fabulous Superlatives

Absolutely fantastic stuff.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:34 pm
 
still can't figure out

fat boy = Rick "President of Columbia Records" Rubin
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:35 pm
 
"Countrypolitan" should be made illegal

but I hate the Oak Ridge Boys more than anything from 1982
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:35 pm
 
Fuck a Hank III.)

Hank III is fine if you like hearing song after song after song about drugs and booze. It gets real old real fast. Non imaginative stupid shit.

If you're going down that road then skip Hank III and listen to Wayne Hancock. Better voice and better songs
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:35 pm
 
Jim Lauderdale

He was doing a lot of co-writing with Jack Ingram for a spell but now that Jack has decided to do gay shit like covering "Lips Of An Angel" and play the total Nashville sound game these days it's a moot point. Jim Lauderdale is good stuff none the less.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:40 pm
 
Hank III is fine if you like hearing song after song after song about drugs anboozed

Hank III is okay if you want to hear something people think is the real deal just cuz of who his grandpa is. His shit sounds completely fake to me. Is he still playing bass in Phil Anselmo's Down?
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:41 pm
 
Yes, Creedence Rule (got into 'em during my Punk years) so do Bobby Gentry and Hank Snow. The ruling triumvirate though, for me would be Charlie Rich, Gary Stewart, and Jerry Lee Lewis - ever present in the 'play' crates. I take it I should rescue Jessie Colter from the 'trade' pile and give her a second spin?

The Princess? "starter won't start" - but as soon as it gets a little warmer, she gets a new one.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:46 pm
 
You have the greatest taste in everything! From food to country music!
I don't know about that. I eat food strangers leave on their plates at restaurants. And I just bought (and enjoyed) 3 Osmonds LP's. Does that sound like good taste to you? Early 70's country just seems so comfortable somehow, like an untouched leftover pancake and bacon strip at an adjacent table at Shoney's.

Also great in the late 60's/early 70's was Charley Pride, who was so much more than "that one black dude who sings C&W." He was a hit machine who made totally catchy, feelgood records with backup singers even whiter than the ones on Ray Charles' country records.
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:52 pm
 
skip to about 1 min

roy acuff, hank williams and the opry gang doing some hillbilly classics. uninterrupted 9 minute live televison clip from 1952.

ummm
short list:
roy acuff

hank williams

bobby bare

johnny bond

johnny cash

patsy cline

dave dudley

lefty frizzel

red foley and brenda lee

marty robbins

hank snow

that ones on a commercial i think
hank thompson

merle travis

ernest tubb

kitty wells

webb pierce, red sovine

charley pride

stonewall jackson

flatt and scruggs (w 7 year old ricky skaggs)
Posted: Jan 3, 2008 11:58 pm | Edited by: dale
 
"that one black dude who sings C&W."

Now all country music has is Cowboy Troy. He hangs out with Big & Rich to give their shitty ass "country hip hop" stuff some cred...It doesn't help one bit though.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:01 am
 
I take it I should rescue Jessie Colter from the 'trade' pile and give her a second spin?
Jessi isn't country in a Dolly/Loretta kind of way. She's more country rock/pop with a lot of soul music in her phrasing. Not Nashville at all. You could sort of compare her to the best Linda Ronstadt stuff, but Colter's stuff was somewhat grittier and she didn't rely as much on cover songs. (And her voice is nowhere near as great as Ronstadt's.) Some of her more upbeat numbers are kinda like Waylon's 70's stuff, which makes sense, because he produced some of her records and she actually wrote some songs and did back-ups vocals on his.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:16 am
 
I don't know about that. I eat food strangers leave on their plates at restaurants. And I just bought (and enjoyed) 3 Osmonds LP's. Does that sound like good taste to you?

Well, my taste. Which I automatically think is good.

The Princess? "starter won't start" - but as soon as it gets a little warmer, she gets a new one.
Thanks for the call. She's as good as gold in you hands, and I'll see her again in the spring!
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:25 am
 
- thanks Hugh - I'll dig up those Jessi Colter records (heck, maybe it's time to reassess Rita Coolidge as well)

Also great in the late 60's/early 70's was Charley Pride
Gary Stewart played piano in his band for a while! - pretty certain there's a live Charlie Pride record where Gary gets to sing a tune.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:33 am
 
Gary Stewart played piano in his band for a while! - pretty certain there's a live Charlie Pride record where Gary gets to sing a tune.
I heard some Gary Stewart songs recently that blew me away. What are the LP's to get by him?
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:43 am
 
"Out of Hand" is fantastic. You can get it on a twofer with the "Your Place or Mine" album.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 12:49 am | Edited by: The Driver
 
I heard some Gary Stewart songs recently that blew me away. What are the LP's to get by him?
-yup, Out Of Hand, Your Place Or Mine, Steppin' Out, Little Junior, are essential and available on disc as two twofers. I've a soft spot for Cactus and a Rose, but it may not be the best place to start. The best of collections are fine because he was mostly writing and cutting singles anyway.

Great piece on Gary (by Jimmy McDonough) here.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 1:16 am
 
been digitizing pre-war country 78s all day...getting into it...N.T. Narmour and S.W. Smith, the Cartwright Bros, Jimmie Rogers and the Three Southerners...good shit...

sounds awesome. how do I go about getting a copy?

re: Jessi Colter - she'll forever get a pass for her songs on the Wanted: the Outlaws record, not to mention the 25th anniversary cd with out-takes of hers (& W & W) that equal, if not surpass the original sequence.

the only other thing I have by her is I'm Jessi Colter. It's definitely worth picking up and fairly easy to find for a couple of bucks. One of those instances that brings into relief the inextricable links btw country & RnB.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:09 am
 
while they've been pretty mediocre the past few years, BR5-49 used to have some kick ass live shows & a few pretty good records.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:27 am
 
Jessi Colter

I could not stand "I'm Not Lisa" when I was a kid but found a new appreciation for in later years. Nope she doesn't have a voice like Linda Ronstadt or Emmylou but she sure can deliver a song. I never picked up the expanded version of the Outlaws CD put hope to find it used someday.

Gary Stewart is damn good too. Seeing his name refreshed my memory. All I got is this collection by him but I'm gonna give it a spin tonight. It's been awhile.

Scored a couple of Bobby Bare records at the thrift shops recently. It's worth giving a listen if you've never heard the stuff. His son's shit is decent too.

Didn't BR5-49 have that song about Betty Page?
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:29 am
 
old man in the comic book store in sore losers is playing a bobby bare song
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:39 am | Edited by: dustymedical
 
still can't figure out

fat boy = Rick "President of Columbia Records" Rubin


i got that part, just trying to figure out what was wrong with the american series, i mean i understand it's no taco bell commercial (done what, a year before the series started?) but i'm not sure what "pretentious" material you're referring to. guy singing accompanied by his guitar=pretentious? ok... hardly any more pretentious than recording an album like "bitter tears" or "the holy land"...
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 3:17 am | Edited by: Rich Balls
 
I wrote this column about country music for the crappy college paper I work for...I even got a letter from a guy bitching that i was wrong...

here it is:
Country music has become a mockery of itself.
Hank Williams Sr. is spinning and convulsing in his grave.
It seems that for the past decade (or two) pop stars have mutated a classic form of American music into a corny trend.
While Garth Brooks may be the biggest point source of this musical diarrhea, I have a feeling this had been trickling down since the 1970s "Rhinestone Cowboy" days.
If I mention Garth, it wouldn't be fair to leave out Shania Twain. She sealed the deal on the end of decent (popular) country music. Soccer moms and deranged men everywhere were line-dancing their hearts out to "I Feel Like a Woman," which was a typical pop song, only she added the twangy-guitar. This fooled listeners into thinking she was playing some real country music! "Well, she does have that twang! Yee-haw!"
That early '90s outbreak inspired not only line dancing, but also encouraged the purchase of those faux-cowboy button-up shirts, shiny cowboy hats, and gave people across the country the delusion that they were "real cowboys." George Carlin commented on this, something like, "Why don't you dress up like a pirate!"
I admit I'm not an expert on new country music; I only catch fragments of it occasionally, usually at crappy restaurants. Though I have noticed that a lot of the male artists sing lyrics in an exaggerated southern accent, about topics pertinent to the average Joe. Which works out perfectly when it comes time to sell an album.
These country singers are millionaire celebrities, yet they always sing about being blue collar, borderline poor, or just "yer average tax-payin' Amurikan, who has problems juss lock you!"
I'm not buying it. If you look into the record industry you would see these turds are produced and molded into moneymakers. Austin, Texas is a hotbed for wanna-be country singers who realized, if you're really lucky, a little talent could get you a lot of money.
A few years ago, country legend Loretta Lynn recorded an album of original, traditional country songs, that she penned herself (not common for country stars). It received rave reviews, won the Grammy for Best Country Album of the Year ... yet it didn't get any airplay on country radio stations. I guess stations reserve airtime for profitable 9-11 tribute songs by Toby Keith and Alan Jackson who have made a fortune off the deaths of the 9-11 victims. Using a tragedy of that caliber for a career booster is pretty un-American if you ask me, but great for business.

--------------------------------------------------------


A letter from a pissed off "country" fan!!!


I have been attending LCC for a year and a half, and have enjoyed you and your colleagues editorials. However, your Oct. 22-Nov. 4, 2007 article on pop country music struck a nerve with me. I found your article agreeable as I read your opinions of pop country star Shania Twain's song "I feel like a woman" and how it has "mutated a classic form of American music into a corny trend". However, as a fan of country music I have to strongly disagree with your statements that "rich celebrities" are masquerading as average joes. What makes country music a great American tradition isn't who sings, but the values and way of life that each song conveys. True country music is patriotic and honest, with no regards to whether you live in the middle of America or the middle of LA.

Secondly, your thoughts about two artists Toby Keith and Alan Jackson, using the 9/11 tragedy as a business move to sell records is wrong and degrading to fans of country music everywhere. It is well known that Toby Keith has strongly supported this country and our troops serving overseas. Songs such as "Remember When" from Alan Jackson and Toby Keith's popular "Courtesy of the Red, White, and Blue" or "American Soldier" are songs that have the power to unite people and heal wounds.

I just wanted to voice my thoughts on your editorial, and my feelings about how you chose to comment on some of my favorite artists.

Sincerely, John Cole.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 3:29 am
 
It goes back farther than that to Chet Atkins and Owen Bradley when they decided that country music needed to be sophisticated and appeal to "city folk."

Yeah, but Chet also was one of the great rock n roll producers. All the immediate post-Sun Elvis stuff, for example. And he was more experimental than anyone gives him credit for. Check out Waylon's mid-60's greaser records (short hair, no beard) which Chet produced - they tried fuzz bass and sitar and things like that, as well as unusual material (including Beatles, Stones, and Dylan covers). Not all of it works, but it's all interesting listening, and way more "out there" than people normally associate with Chet, and way more rock n roll than anything else coming out of Nashville at that period.

"Countrypolitan" should be made illegal

I used to think that, too, but the older I get the more I appreciate it. It's like anything else, there's good countrypolitan and bad countrypolitan. Roger Miller, Don Gibson, Patsy Cline...these are all great countrypolitan types.

As far as the Cash/American stuff, his version of Petty's "Southern Accents" is my favorite performance of his whole career. I can't listen to it without getting choked up.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:13 am
 
It goes back farther than that to Chet Atkins and Owen Bradley when they decided that country music needed to be sophisticated and appeal to "city folk." Some of those productions are brilliant and timeless but it did plant the seeds to the adult contemporary music that country became in the 80's.

While I agree w/ the "brilliant and timeless" as well as "plant the seeds to the adult contemporary music" parts - you can't blame Chet Atkins and Owen Bradley for the people who copied them badly!

Also great in the late 60's/early 70's was Charley Pride, who was so much more than "that one black dude who sings C&W." He was a hit machine who made totally catchy, feelgood records with backup singers even whiter than the ones on Ray Charles' country records.

Charley Pride rarely got his props.... he'll be getting them soon enough... but man --- he's a treasure trove! thank you for recognizing him!!
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:25 am
 
Charley Pride rarely got his props.... he'll be getting them soon enough... but man --- he's a treasure trove! thank you for recognizing him!!
I've never listened to Charley, I'll give him a shot!
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 7:12 am | Edited by: Mullett
 
It always like Johnny Cash, especially "Don't Take Your Guns to Town", but never warmed up to country music even with Jayson Brown & Jim Webber playing stuff for me & hovering over me asking me if I was stupid.

It took me a while to sink my teeth into it, but eventually, I came around. It was Merle Haggard at 1st, then George Jones, then Faron Young, etc...
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 7:54 am
 
Merle Haggard

there's this undercurrent here in california to get him named as the state's poet laureate... but they always choose some hippie from santa cruz.

hag is like god to me
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:01 pm
 
Jim Webber playing stuff for me & hovering over me asking me if I was stupid.

I knew I liked Jim for some reason.

The Johnny Cash American records are proof positive that the guy coulda been singing names outta the phone book and it woulda sounded great. And it's the best stuff Rick ever produced other than Licensed To Ill, Raisin Hell and Slayer. I'm glad I don't have your ears.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:12 pm
 
I used to think that, too, but the older I get the more I appreciate it. It's like anything else, there's good countrypolitan and bad countrypolitan. Roger Miller, Don Gibson, Patsy Cline...these are all great countrypolitan types.

agree 100%. The ideologies may have been BS, but there was some great music that came out of this vein.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 2:14 pm
 
I like both kinds of music.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 3:10 pm
 
Charley Pride rarely got his props.... he'll be getting them soon enough... but man --- he's a treasure trove! thank you for recognizing him!!

Another good, if not as known, black country artist is Stoney Edwards. He was doing stuff around the same time as Charley Pride( was even on Jack Clements record label- who produced both he and Charley Pride)

You should check him out. Amazing voice. Great songwriter.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 4:34 pm
 
Cowboy Jack Clements is another fine treasure.
he's still around
making music
making films
wake & bake
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 4:43 pm
 
Country is a genre (like metal and some others) where I love the elite and have no time for anything else. Cash, Williams, Carter Family, Patsy, etc., and a some songs here and there. There's no increase or decrease in how I feel about 'em now vs. when I was 16. If anything, I'm more impatient now and listen to less country. Gotta make room for opera! Whoooooooooeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:13 pm
 
I loved that Gary Stewart article. He's one of my favorites, and never heard many first hand accounts of him, except that he was incredible live. The best of CD on Hightone is great until you get to the Hightone material. For some reason he reminds me of Warren Oates in "Cockfighter", which is a very good thing...
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:47 pm
 
The Johnny Cash American records are proof positive that the guy coulda been singing names outta the phone book and it woulda sounded great. And it's the best stuff Rick ever produced other than Licensed To Ill, Raisin Hell and Slayer. I'm glad I don't have your ears.

Those last CASH albums are great. Rubin did him as much justice as a bigtime producer could.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:51 pm
 
what rubin did was open the field for song choices and let the enormity of cash's voice and persona take up the space on otherwise spartan recordings. no one had ever done that for cash before

the song choices are unusual only in that some nashville A&R guy would never have considered songs for cash by U2 or trent reznor. i think that's the genius of their musical artist/producer relationship

tom petty has said of rubin as a producer is that he lets the artist be an artist and doesn't lord over the recording. probably the engineer does the most "Work" in making sure the right sound is captured...

for all his idiosyncrasies as a businessman, as a producer, rick rubin is almost untouchable
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:51 pm
 
Country is a genre (like metal and some others) where I love the elite and have no time for anything else. Cash, Williams, Carter Family, Patsy, etc., and a some songs here and there. There's no increase or decrease in how I feel about 'em now vs. when I was 16. If anything, I'm more impatient now and listen to less country. Gotta make room for opera! Whoooooooooeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuh

Next time you're in Milwaukee, you're coming to my house and I'll play you nothing but old country and punch you in the face when you try to leave. That'll learn ya'...
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:53 pm
 
Warren Oates in "Cockfighter"

YES!!!! amazing movie.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 5:58 pm
 
for newer guys I like Richard Buckner and Freakwater....
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 6:08 pm
 
J.D. "Cast" King put out a great CD a couple years ago. Can't remember the label, but it was my favorite country release of 2006. He just died a couple weeks ago. Apparently he recorded at Sun in the late 50's although none of the sessions survived. very stark stuff with a great voice. Look for the Larry Jon Wilson CD coming out this year. It's fantastic. New recordings in a Lee Hazelwood/Kris Kristofferson mold. Just acoustic guitar and violin. GREAT VOICE. He was a 70's guy kinda like Tony Joe White. Any of you guys hip to him?
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 6:19 pm
 
The Johnny Cash American records are proof positive that the guy coulda been singing names outta the phone book and it woulda sounded great. And it's the best stuff Rick ever produced other than Licensed To Ill, Raisin Hell and Slayer

Rubin did him as much justice as a bigtime producer could.



You're a sucker, Rich.

c'mon, all the stuff he did sounded the same --- sure JC had the chops but those records make him into a drama queen. I'd rather have generic Nashville than portentuous "dark" covers of NIN crap.
John was just open-minded enough to take that pill. Merle never even needed to go the medicine chest and Willie does it naturally!

Today's "Country" is even more cookie-cutter than mallpunk, hip-hop or the hollowest pop-rock. It's product masquerading as art.

The fact that Mutt Lange could make his wife into a country star just because he wanted to speaks volumes. Anybody can use a digital delay, if it had never been invented Rick Rubin would be serving up sliders at White Castle right now, which is pretty much what he does for CBS.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 6:27 pm
 
The Jim Ford "Harlan County" CD that just came out on Bear Family is great. The LP sounds better, but is a bit hard to find. Wild country soul. He just died also. Too much coke with Sly Stone apparently.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 6:41 pm
 
JC had the chops but those records make him into a drama queen.

again, listen to "Bitter Tears" (1964) or "The Holy Land" (1969). The America Recordings didn't "make" him into anything he wasn't already.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 6:42 pm | Edited by: dustymedical
 
Willie does it naturally

you must have forgotten his collaborations with ROB THOMAS and KID ROCK

http://www.mtv.com/news/articles/1445154/20010713/nelson_willie.jhtml
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 7:06 pm
 
You're a sucker, Rich.
Becuase I can listen to music NOT RECORDED on a 4-track recorder, and not feel un-cool about it. Go keep it real in the Terminal Boredom room!!
The only sucker here is you, slobbin on my knob.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 7:11 pm
 
feel un-cool


I listen to music, not the crowd.

Rick Rubin is a pander bear.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 7:24 pm
 
I've also noticed that Rich Balls is quite the sucker.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 10:07 pm
 
This is one of the better country records to come out(2006) in the last few years. His first record, mind you. Excellent from beginning to end.

Theres plenty of good country music being put out, it just doesn't get any radio play.
Posted: Jan 4, 2008 10:53 pm
 
JC had the chops but those records make him into a drama queen. I'd rather have generic Nashville than portentuous "dark" covers of NIN crap.

i think that JC's cover of "Hurt" is in no way shape or form "drama queen" material! sure, it did a lot more good for trent reznor than it did for JC, but JC gave that song the gravitas that its original version lacked... sure the NIN version sounded dark - but JC's baritone and stark delivery gave the song the creep factor it lacked... before, it was just the whine of a spoiled rich narcissistic computer geek.... JC sounded hurt
Posted: Jan 5, 2008 2:35 am
 
I've also noticed that Rich Balls is quite the sucker.
So I hear... back in my rap days I was also called a Sucka MC...I was humilitated, and left the rap game ... forever.
Posted: Jan 5, 2008 2:47 pm
 
Johnny's version of Hurt is pretty great. You must be deaf. Johnny Cash knew a hell of a lot more than you about music, Cheif. You got a lot to learn if you don't think that stuff is great. It stands along with the greatest music ever made in America. Maybe you can't handle the fact that something that great was done in your lifetime. Just like a lot of people slept on Ornette Coleman's last record, Sound Grammar. I seen Johnny in his last public performance ever (or maybe second to last because he did that CBS special the same week). He sang two songs with June about dying and seeing each other again in Heaven. That's as heavy as it gets.
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 6:44 pm
 
Ornette Coleman's last record, Sound Grammar.


yeah, at least OC spent some time playing music instead of just having Rick Rubin twiddle his knobs.

I seen Johnny in his last public performance ever (or maybe second to last because he did that CBS special the same week). He sang two songs with June about dying and seeing each other again in Heaven

yee gawds, did the man have no shame? guess that's what being born again does for you. too bad a great artist like Cash had to ruin his legacy with a lot of half-baked digitally enhanced solo shots and that Hollywood dramarama featuring a bad lip.

i feel better now, let's do some goofballs
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 7:09 pm
 
yeah, at least OC spent some time playing music instead of just having Rick Rubin twiddle his knobs
What band records and doesn't have to adjust some knobs?
So if an album is mixed, its no good?
Would you prefer a bootleg recording with a handheld recorder?

Johnny played music since the 50s, let the guy record in a decent studio.
I think you are just obsessed with knobs, for slobbering purposes.
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 7:13 pm
 
obsessed with knobs

This is not the Amputee thread.
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 7:18 pm
 
Rick set him up on the couch with 2 mics in front of him. The signal went through a Tascam four track (It's true! Look at the pictures in the booklet.) and then into Rick's board. I doubt there was much left for him to do. The production was in the reduction (to voice and guitar, mostly).
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 7:39 pm
 
Rich & Rich,

have you ever crushed goofballs and then snorted them? it kinda burns your nose, but whatta rush.

Sometimes what the doctor ordered just doesn't do it. Even Dr. Rubin.

Translation: That shit is WEAK. Rubin wrecked music, even JC's, and is still wrecking music. He's a pap product producer and should go take a long hike on a short Malibooo pier.

No doubt the fatso would sink like a stone.
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 9:55 pm
 
Translation: That shit is WEAK. Rubin wrecked music, even JC\'s,
I would love to hear that new Jesus Christ "Holy Wars" LP
I heard its a real foot stomper!!!
A great follow up to the "Yeah, I'm Jesus" EP
Posted: Jan 7, 2008 10:23 pm
 
Jesse, how was Cash "born again?" He was doing Jesus songs for decades before that final performance. I never paid much attention to the Rubin stuff, maybe I should. I don't see in any way what was wrong with trying to resurrect an American treasure in a non-grossout way in order to help expose him to a new generation. I'm sure Johnny loved the attention, too. I regret not going to a small (75 capacity) Cash show about a decade ago about a mile from where I grew up out in the sticks, parents had extra tickets & invited me, thought it'd be square and boring, stupid me. Never saw him.
Posted: Jan 8, 2008 7:53 pm
 
Shooters kind of hit or miss. "4th. of July" is one of the better country songs of the past few years

"...so we put on a little George Jones and just sang a lot!"

George joining in on the end is a nice touch too.
Posted: Jan 15, 2008 5:12 am
 
It's SHIT LIKE THIS that is wrong with modern country.
Posted: Jul 9, 2008 5:03 pm
 
NP: Johnny Paycheck - The Little Darlin Years
Posted: Jul 10, 2008 12:09 pm
 
Too bad this "4th of July" is so much better. Couldn't find a good version of Dave Alvin on youtube so Mr. Doe will have to do.



I sure as hell don't look to Nashville or the business for my country and love finding great country songs in unlikely places.
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 12:57 am
 
Yeah, I went through that "I can appreciate the themes in Country songs now" phase at some point, but now I've gotten past that and back to gay disco. You will too, you'll see.
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 1:31 am
 
roy acuff

hank williams

bobby bare

johnny bond

johnny cash

patsy cline

dave dudley

lefty frizzel

red foley and brenda lee

marty robbins

hank snow

that ones on a commercial i think
hank thompson

merle travis

ernest tubb

kitty wells

webb pierce, red sovine

charley pride

stonewall jackson

flatt and scruggs (w 7 year old ricky skaggs)
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 1:09 pm
 
Hayes Carll's new album has practically been glued to my car CD player the past few months....Well, him and Chris Knight.
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 1:51 pm
 
Charlie Rich, Gary Stewart, and Jerry Lee Lewis -


http://www.furious.com/perfect/garystewart.html


I heard some Gary Stewart songs recently that blew me away. What are the LP's to get by him?


his 70's work is killer

yr place4 or mine would be a good start
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 1:53 pm
 
is johnny dowd part of this thread? if so, the best, but that red webb stuff is great

and if flatt and scruggs can get mentioned then then mention their pappy, the leader, the man:

Posted: Jul 13, 2008 1:59 pm
 
the flatlanders

Posted: Jul 13, 2008 2:20 pm
 
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 2:26 pm
 
low point in modern music



not enough of these fuckers died
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 2:28 pm
 
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 2:39 pm
 
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 2:54 pm | Edited by: jerryd
 
Hayes Carll's new album has practically been glued to my car CD player the past few months

This album is REALLY good.

I've been listening to a lot of Wynn Stewart lately. great stuff.

And i don't know if it counts, but the new Alejandro Escovedo album is superb
Posted: Jul 13, 2008 10:23 pm | Edited by: jerryd
 
Jerry Jeff Walker singing desperados waiting for a train just blows me away...

... but this is guys song and it's just haunting when he sings it.
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 1:02 am
 
Alright, motherfuckers!
What I really wanna know here is how many of you pitched any hay, rode any horses or slopped any hogs when you were a kid.
I did.
That's what country is anyway ...that and bein' busted up over your lady suckin' the cock of the guy in the trailer next door (never had that happen, thank god, guns and guts).
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 1:31 am
 
slopped any hogs

i remember sum of dem hogs you slopped back in the days!OINK
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 2:18 am
 
this is probably the lowest point in country!

Man that's like saying this is the worst painting in the Louvre!
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 2:29 am
 
That's what country is anyway ...that and bein' busted up over your lady suckin' the cock of the guy in the trailer next door (never had that happen, thank god, guns and guts).
is that the plot of your latest porn vid?
sounds quite dramatic in an "Earl" type way
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 3:24 am
 
Man that's like saying this is the worst painting in the Louvre!

are you really tryin to compare country music to the louvre?? REALLY?
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 3:45 am
 
What I really wanna know here is how many of you pitched any hay, rode any horses or slopped any hogs when you were a kid.

yes, yes and no.
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 4:29 am
 
O.K. then... now me can move on to some rock and roll!
Keep on churnin' till the butter comes
Keep on churnin' till the butter comes
Keep on pumpin' make the butter flow
Wipe off the paddle and churn some mo'!
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 5:33 am | Edited by: SSSSSSS
 
What I really wanna know here is how many of you pitched any hay, rode any horses or slopped any hogs when you were a kid.

I done all three. I really get a kick out of personals ads that say "I like all types of music except country and rap."

Bullshit you do! I got some records to play for you that you'll make you wish you had some "country and rap" to listen to.

Then after that I'll spin a buncha country and rap records just to getcha outta my house!

If that don't work, watch out for Huey Lewis and the News.
Posted: Jul 14, 2008 5:38 am
 
Damn, I love drunken grammar!
Posted: Jul 15, 2008 11:51 am
 
Keep on pumpin' make the butter flow
Wipe off the paddle and churn some mo'!


when's the last time you did the PIG PEN BOOGIE?
Posted: Jul 16, 2008 4:50 am
 
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 1:19 am
 
...I wanna sow who likes to gobble her chow...
Awesome, and delivered with a straight face (one assumes).
Chubby-chaser's delight!
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 9:10 am
 
hey driver, i haven't been reading this thread, but you do know that hank williams is a god, right? i know it's obvious, but i don't know if anyone ever bothered to mention it here because of that.
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 10:14 am | Edited by: michael baker
 
hey driver, i haven't been reading this thread, but you do know that hank williams is a god, right? i know it's obvious, but i don't know if anyone ever bothered to mention it here because of that.




cold cold
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 10:35 am
 
What I really wanna know here is how many of you pitched any hay, rode any horses or slopped any hogs when you were a kid.


i dated a girl from albania. does that count?
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 2:52 pm
 
old country is good oldies now.

new country bites and I don't really like "alt country" either.

it all started going downhill with "countrypolitan". There must be somebody to blame for that ...
Posted: Jul 17, 2008 8:38 pm
 
There must be somebody to blame for that ...

Ronnie Milsap
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