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Posted: Aug 13, 2007 12:52 am
 
New York Times
August 11, 2007
Op-Ed Contributor
How Did Elvis Get Turned Into a Racist?
By PETER GURALNICK

ONE of the songs Elvis Presley liked to perform in the '70s was Joe South's "Walk a Mile in My Shoes," its message clearly spelled out in the title.

Sometimes he would preface it with the 1951 Hank Williams recitation "Men With Broken Hearts," which may well have been South's original inspiration. "You've never walked in that man's shoes/Or saw things through his eyes/Or stood and watched with helpless hands/While the heart inside you dies." For Elvis these two songs were as much about social justice as empathy and understanding: "Help your brother along the road," the Hank Williams number concluded, "No matter where you start/For the God that made you made them, too/These men with broken hearts."

In Elvis's case, this simple lesson was not just a matter of paying lip service to an abstract principle.

It was what he believed, it was what his music had stood for from the start: the breakdown of barriers, both musical and racial. This is not, unfortunately, how it is always perceived 30 years after his death, the anniversary of which is on Thursday. When the singer Mary J. Blige expressed her reservations about performing one of his signature songs, she only gave voice to a view common in the African-American community. "I prayed about it," she said, "because I know Elvis was a racist."

And yet, as the legendary Billboard editor Paul Ackerman, a devotee of English Romantic poetry as well as rock 'n' roll, never tired of pointing out, the music represented not just an amalgam of America's folk traditions (blues, gospel, country) but a bold restatement of an egalitarian ideal. "In one aspect of America's cultural life," Ackerman wrote in 1958, "integration has already taken place."

It was due to rock 'n' roll, he emphasized, that groundbreaking artists like Big Joe Turner, Ray Charles, Chuck Berry and Little Richard, who would only recently have been confined to the "race" market, had acquired a broad-based pop following, while the music itself blossomed neither as a regional nor a racial phenomenon but as a joyful new synthesis "rich with Negro and hillbilly lore."

No one could have embraced Paul Ackerman's formulation more forcefully (or more fully) than Elvis Presley.

Asked to characterize his singing style when he first presented himself for an audition at the Sun recording studio in Memphis, Elvis said that he sang all kinds of music "I don't sound like nobody." This, as it turned out, was far more than the bravado of an 18-year-old who had never sung in public before. It was in fact as succinct a definition as one might get of the democratic vision that fueled his music, a vision that denied distinctions of race, of class, of category, that embraced every kind of music equally, from the highest up to the lowest down.

It was, of course, in his embrace of black music that Elvis came in for his fiercest criticism. On one day alone, Ackerman wrote, he received calls from two Nashville music executives demanding in the strongest possible terms that Billboard stop listing Elvis's records on the best-selling country chart because he played black music. He was simply seen as too low class, or perhaps just too no-class, in his refusal to deny recognition to a segment of society that had been rendered invisible by the cultural mainstream.

"Down in Tupelo, Mississippi," Elvis told a white reporter for The Charlotte Observer in 1956, he used to listen to Arthur Crudup, the blues singer who originated "That's All Right," Elvis's first record. Crudup, he said, used to "bang his box the way I do now, and I said if I ever got to the place where I could feel all old Arthur felt, I'd be a music man like nobody ever saw."

It was statements like these that caused Elvis to be seen as something of a hero in the black community in those early years. In Memphis the two African-American newspapers, The Memphis World and The Tri-State Defender, hailed him as a "race man" not just for his music but also for his indifference to the usual social distinctions. In the summer of 1956, The World reported, "the rock 'n' roll phenomenon cracked Memphis's segregation laws" by attending the Memphis Fairgrounds amusement park "during what is designated as 'colored night.'"

That same year, Elvis also attended the otherwise segregated WDIA Goodwill Revue, an annual charity show put on by the radio station that called itself the "Mother Station of the Negroes." In the aftermath of the event, a number of Negro newspapers printed photographs of Elvis with both Rufus Thomas and B.B. King ("Thanks, man, for all the early lessons you gave me," were the words The Tri-State Defender reported he said to Mr. King).

When he returned to the revue the following December, a stylish shot of him "talking shop" with Little Junior Parker and Bobby "Blue" Bland appeared in Memphis's mainstream afternoon paper, The Press-Scimitar, accompanied by a short feature that made Elvis's feelings abundantly clear. "It was the real thing," he said, summing up both performance and audience response. "Right from the heart."

Just how committed he was to a view that insisted not just on musical accomplishment but fundamental humanity can be deduced from his reaction to the earliest appearance of an ugly rumor that has persisted in one form or another to this day. Elvis Presley, it was said increasingly within the African-American community, had declared, either at a personal appearance in Boston or on Edward R. Murrow's "Person to Person" television program, "The only thing Negroes can do for me is buy my records and shine my shoes."

That he had never appeared in Boston or on Murrow's program did nothing to abate the rumor, and so in June 1957, long after he had stopped talking to the mainstream press, he addressed the issue and an audience that scarcely figured in his sales demographic in an interview for the black weekly Jet.

Anyone who knew him, he told reporter Louie Robinson, would immediately recognize that he could never have uttered those words. Amid testimonials from black people who did know him, he described his attendance as a teenager at the church of celebrated black gospel composer, the Rev. W. Herbert Brewster, whose songs had been recorded by Mahalia Jackson and Clara Ward and whose stand on civil rights was well known in the community. (Elvis's version of "Peace in the Valley," said Dr. Brewster later, was "one of the best gospel recordings I've ever heard.")

The interview's underlying point was the same as the underlying point of his music: far from asserting any superiority, he was merely doing his best to find a place in a musical continuum that included breathtaking talents like Ray Charles, Roy Hamilton, the Five Blind Boys of Mississippi and Howlin' Wolf on the one hand, Hank Williams, Bill Monroe and the Statesmen Quartet on the other. "Let's face it," he said of his rhythm and blues influences, "nobody can sing that kind of music like colored people. I can't sing it like Fats Domino can. I know that."

And as for prejudice, the article concluded, quoting an unnamed source, "To Elvis people are people, regardless of race, color or creed."

So why didn't the rumor die? Why did it continue to find common acceptance up to, and past, the point that Chuck D of Public Enemy could declare in 1990, "Elvis was a hero to most... straight-up racist that sucker was, simple and plain"?

Chuck D has long since repudiated that view for a more nuanced one of cultural history, but the reason for the rumor's durability, the unassailable logic behind its common acceptance within the black community rests quite simply on the social inequities that have persisted to this day, the fact that we live in a society that is no more perfectly democratic today than it was 50 years ago. As Chuck D perceptively observes, what does it mean, within this context, for Elvis to be hailed as "king," if Elvis's enthronement obscures the striving, the aspirations and achievements of so many others who provided him with inspiration?

Elvis would have been the first to agree. When a reporter referred to him as the "king of rock 'n' roll" at the press conference following his 1969 Las Vegas opening, he rejected the title, as he always did, calling attention to the presence in the room of his friend Fats Domino, "one of my influences from way back." The larger point, of course, was that no one should be called king; surely the music, the American musical tradition that Elvis so strongly embraced, could stand on its own by now, after crossing all borders of race, class and even nationality.

"The lack of prejudice on the part of Elvis Presley," said Sam Phillips, the Sun Records founder who discovered him, "had to be one of the biggest things that ever happened. It was almost subversive, sneaking around through the music, but we hit things a little bit, don't you think?"

Or, as Jake Hess, the incomparable lead singer for the Statesmen Quartet and one of Elvis's lifelong influences, pointed out: "Elvis was one of those artists, when he sang a song, he just seemed to live every word of it. There's other people that have a voice that's maybe as great or greater than Presley's, but he had that certain something that everybody searches for all during their lifetime."

To do justice to that gift, to do justice to the spirit of the music, we have to extend ourselves sometimes beyond the narrow confines of our own experience, we have to challenge ourselves to embrace the democratic principle of the music itself, which may in the end be its most precious gift.

Peter Guralnick is the author of "Careless Love: The Unmaking of Elvis Presley."
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 12:56 am
 
I can't wait for death week to be over.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 1:09 am
 
Fuck Chuck D and his whole ilk.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 2:39 am
 
Shit, I love Elvis. I hate the fact that the man was cold in his grave 9 days before I even came into this shitty world.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 2:41 am
 
duh.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 2:54 am
 
i hate the fact that elvis' death cut into my get smart viewing time!

ah, the old dead bloated honky junkie cracker motherfuck on a toilet trick...
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 3:20 am
 
i hate the fact that elvis' death cut into my get smart viewing time!
racist fag!
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 3:58 am
 
elvis sucks.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 3:58 am
 
well, the sun stuff is good, but otherwise he sucks.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:26 am
 
ah, the old he started out great and then started to suck trick...
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:37 am
 
guralnick rules.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:38 am
 
fuck it all.. I love elvis.. everything about him.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:41 am
 
are you prepared to sell your soul?
to be the king of rock n roll...

woah thar elvis

as far as chuck d is concerned, public enemy just released their first album in 7 years! they were on jimmy kimmel the other night and i was gonna watch but got sidetracked./
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:50 am
 
guralnick rules.

fuck yeah

fuck it all.. I love elvis.. everything about him.

double fuck yeah
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:15 am
 
i love chuck d
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:25 am
 
i love chuck d
Yeah but you like lots of shitty stuff.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:39 am
 
chuck d wouldve kicked elvis' ass. and who is still alive?
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:39 am
 
the ramones and elvis are dead. chuck d is alive!
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:41 am
 
les paul is alive and elvis is dead.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:45 am
 
fuck elvis.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:54 am
 
as far as chuck d is concerned, public enemy just released their first album in 7 years!

don't be a cunt, that album with paris was a pe album, too...
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 8:01 am
 
I thought Run DMC were the Kings of Rock--weird. 'Nation of Millions' is my favorite rap album ever but I sure wouldn't claim to agree with all of Chuck D's verbalisms dissing Elvis and supporting Farrakhan.

-Ryan
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 2:44 pm
 
SKREWDRIVER WEREN'T RACISTS THOUGH!!!!!!
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 3:12 pm
 
not really, they were just idiots. even their most hate filled songs still strike me as parody, or at least too stupid to be serious. novelty band.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 4:55 pm
 
even their most hate filled songs still strike me as parody, or at least too stupid to be serious. novelty band.

ah yes...inspiring hate - what a novelty...

as for Elvis - I think he's fucking awesome...still do...one of my early faves as a kid...and if you see any interview with him at any point in his career, he's a nice, humble guy who clearly seems like he's pretty flabbergasted at his own career, etc...

I think the P.E. thing was more about calling attention to the fact that the people who inspired & taught Elvis have fallen by the wayside & recieve no props for what they've contributed to modern music... calling him a racist (albiet a misinformed opinion) - I feel - was more about shock value....

but what do I know?....
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:45 pm
 
Lets see Elvis recorded black music, ate soul food, hung out with black folks in Memphis yeah thats real racist there. Presley was hardly a racist and Mary J Blige and Chuck D are idiots. Then again all rappers and modern day R&B singers are idiots and none of then know their history. Music goes back further than George Clinton you fucking morons
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 5:47 pm
 
Elvis had more talent in his bowel movements than Chuck D. has in his entire body.

For one thing, E. could actually play an instrument, not just sing along to records & make stupid statements while endorsing German tennis shoes
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:10 pm
 
Elvis sucked. I don't care who he hung out with or what he ate, it doesn't make his music any better. Chuck D on the other hand made awesome music. He also gave props to alot more people than just George Clinton and Mickey's opinion is not only ignorant, it's fucking racist.

Cracker ass motherfuckers.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:15 pm
 
Chuck D on the other hand made awesome music.


shows what you know... hank shocklee made all that shit, including most of the lyrics.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:19 pm
 
shows what you know... hank shocklee made all that shit, including most of the lyrics.

Da Bomb Squad!!!!!
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:25 pm
 
word is born, dun.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:36 pm
 
In the ghetto-oh.....
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:40 pm
 
Elvis was a narc and was a tattle-tale on the beatles.
Fuck that snitch.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:40 pm
 
i love elvis. the entire catalog.

chuck d bores me shitless, always did. i'm tired of his pseudo-scholarly bullshit, too. he should get back in the studio and try to match his earlier output, which some people seemed to enjoy.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:46 pm
 
I'm suprised the article doesn't take the obvious aspect of history into account. Look, it doesn't matter what Elvis did or didn't do, he's a white southerner who rose to popularity in Memphis during the Jim Crow era. I'm sure MLK getting assasinated in Memphis didn't help his image. Of course people are going to think he's a racist. People are fucking stupid. Trust me, I watched Rush Hour 3 yesterday and your average American likes nothing more than a played out old stereotype. Of course Elvis is a racist. And Barack Obama is an Allah worshipping, baby-eating suicide bomber. Duh!
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 6:49 pm
 
they eat babies? oh my stars and garters.
hookorcrook
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 8:27 pm
 
the important thing to remember is that mary j blige prayed on the issue.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 9:00 pm
 
Elvis Presley paid for Jackie Wilson\'s funeral. What racist peckerwood would do that?

The whole \"racist\" shit started when he made a joke onstage about one of his black backup singers (they had a name, but I forget it) frying catfish and stinking up the place. Fuck \'em if they can\'t take a joke.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 9:33 pm
 
For one thing, E. could actually play an instrument,


assuming you consider priscilla's butthole to be an instrument...
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 11:18 pm
 
Elvis was the original wigger. He sashayed around Memphis town in the 50's wearing only freshest Lansky gear despite being labeled race traitor and NL.
Posted: Aug 13, 2007 11:34 pm
 
The only part of "The Commitments" I really liked was when the guy auditioning for the band sang "Elvis was a Cajun" and the Dad from Star Trek kicked him out of the house....
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:08 am
 
he should get back in the studio and try to match his earlier output, which some people seemed to enjoy.
he did! public enemy's new record (first in 7 years) hit stores less than a week ago. how long has it been since elvis had a new record? and sure elvis kinda played guitar but if you listen to the million dollar quartet you'll hear him asking carl perkins how to play standard chords like D and G. scotty moore was an important link to the early elvis sound (although not entirely him, all one needs to do is listen to his crappy solo records to confirm). elvis was an asshole for firing his backing band soon after signing to RCA, buddy holly an asshole too for the same reason. they started as the crickets, then buddy holly and the crickets, and finally for a short time buddy hollys crickets before he finally ditched them altogether. elvis was a cunt. little richard was the queen of rock n roll, chuck berry was the king. chuck d is awesome.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:16 am
 
public enemy's new record (first in 7 years) hit stores less than a week ago.

next I suppose you'll be mentioning a podcast...

Chuck D. (actually, Carl Ridenhour) would have been crunching numbers for Dunkin' Donuts if it weren't for E.

E. broke the ice
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:17 am
 
E was a fucking narc.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:18 am
 
FUCK YOU, DEATHWEEK!! TAKE YOUR CANDLES HOME!!! IT'S HOT ENOUGH, ALREADY!
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:36 am
 
My mom always told me that Chuck Berry was the king of Rock-n-Roll...til Elvis died. She always had more Elvis records in her collection that Chuck Berry records. Then again she had more Duane Eddy and Dick Dale record that Elvis or Chuck. Nowadays...She's got tons of Elvis boxsets, the great 28 Chuck collection and a GH's collection from Duane and Dick.

Iggy Pop could have made his millions back in the 70's if Elvis wouldn't have died the week Lust For Life came out so RCA pushed it out of the way to print up a billion more Elvis records.

Elvis' "limited edition" Reese's cups suck too but Jack Oblivian once told me he was thought the special way Elvis liked his peanut butter and banana sandwiches. Something to do with the way the bananas are smushed with a fork.

If Elvis was alive today would he come into Goner and buy Eric a cadillac? Would he try to pull a Kung Fu move on Jack Stands for talking shit?

Would Sam Phillips hair come from the grave and get in a fight with Carl Perkins hairpiece?

Goddammit! Where the proper jack adaptor so I get these headphones to work?!

"No Action" is a damn cool Elvis song.

I'm gonna click all the Elvis related Google ads here now.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:50 am
 
if elvis was alive today he probably would have spent the last 30 years embarassing himself with shitty movie appearances and even shittier records. by this point the public would be sick of him and he'd be about as relevant as modern day jerry lee lewis. he'd be riding in a wheelchair and shitting in a colostomy bag. les paul is a class act, alive and performing into his 90s. elvis is a dead cunt.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:54 am
 
actually jerry lee's new record aint half bad so i take that back. if elvis was alive today he'd be less relevant than modern day jerry lee lewis, except for to a bunch of blue haired old ladies at the nursing home.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 1:58 am | Edited by: Jack Stands
 
He'd narc on other musicians for using drugs because they were hurting his record sales. And probably cover that "This is our country" song by the mellancamp.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:03 am | Edited by: Rumpleforeskin
 
Here's how it breaks down-Rock and roll is about 50 and some change years old. According to Bradx's list of what sucks always involves stuff that originates from the first half of those 50 years and stuff from the second half- the half where he arrived on the scene- is ruled "awesome". Therefore the only worthwhile music is that which was made in his lifetime. Anything made before he arrived is shit.
Brad , using this criteria, any judgement call you make is tainted and carries no value.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:09 am
 
If Elvis were alive today he'd be doing a duets record with guest like Bono, Kelly Clarkston and that guy from Matchbox 20.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:10 am
 
nah, he worshipps link and li'l rich and bo at least.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:11 am
 
...and I do blame Elvis for me typing "that" instead of "than" twice in a previous post.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:18 am
 
But he did have some hot tail as co-stars in some of his films
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:26 am
 
rumplefuckface, you obviously know nothing about me. my record collection is at least half 50s and 60s, i dont know the exact number and im not gonna sit here counting thousands of records all night. therefore, any judgement you make of me is inaccurate and carries no value.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:38 am
 
But what about the hot tail co-stars? Let's not forget he played an injun in one of his films too.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:39 am
 
chuck berry was the king.

no, Chuck Berry STILL IS the king of rock 'n roll; I've seen him play in St. Louis six times already and, aside from playing mostly the same songs every time and forgetting some of the lyrics, he's awesome
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:39 am
 
also, he is alive.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:42 am
 
king creole is the last elvis movie i could watch all the way through, the 60s ones just suck, like his records from the same time.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 2:48 am
 
If it wasn't for Elvis it would've probably taken me longer to learn who Tony Joe White is.

Hey I was like 5 years old or some shit at the time...
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 5:27 pm
 
the meta on "Paradise Hawaiian Style" is awesome. that is one ... deep ... movie. if you like tiki, check it out.

ELVIS
LIVES
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 5:29 pm
 
any judgement you make of me is inaccurate and carries no value.


who makes judgement on you? you've already proved ad infinitum that the point is on your head, dunce-boy.

so keep it up, laughter is the best medicine
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:32 pm
 
If somebody found recordings of Elvis taking a shit I would sit down to listen to it. Elvis is King. I don't like people that don't like Elvis.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:37 pm
 
you'd listen to recordings of anybody taking a shit though.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:40 pm
 
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:44 pm
 
what about something like this?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Having_Fun_with_Elvis_on_Stage


Thank you, I'm looking on ebay right now...
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:45 pm
 
you'd listen to recordings of anybody taking a shit though.

Elvis would do it with that certain style.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 6:52 pm
 
what about something like this?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Having_Fun_with_Elvis_on_Stage


Supposedly Cargo released Volme 5 of this atrocity on September 11th, 2006
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 7:56 pm
 
I've got two copies of that record for some reason.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 9:18 pm
 
if elvis was alive today he probably would have spent the last 30 years embarassing himself with shitty movie appearances
Probably not. He lived 8 years after his last movie was released. He was getting sick of the lame scripts, and besides, he had become box office poison.

If he lived, I'm guessing he would have become even more unhip for a few more years and then be resurrected as retro-chic like Tom Jones or Tony Bennet. By now, Jack White would be doing albums with him and winning Elvis a Grammy in the process.

Elvis died on my 10th birthday. At the time, I had no idea who he really was. Later, I learned to love him and I still think he rules. I remember seeing Public Enemy live and hearing Flava Flav bark out that comment about Elvis being a racist. Like a rube, I believed them- even though they were the same group who kept a fool like Professor Griff hanging around.
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 10:07 pm
 
The worst part is that we never got to see what could have been the greatest father-daughter rock 'n roll act ever.

I don't think the King would have put up with L.M. playin' that crap she does if he was still around.

In fact, until she broke her act, I was convinced E. was living & breathing and waiting for that moment to begin his 2nd comeback. But it was not to be.

PROVE ME WRONG, E!
Posted: Aug 14, 2007 11:21 pm | Edited by: Uptight White
 
But he did have some hot tail as co-stars in some of his films

And I heard he scored with all of them except Mary Tyler Moore.
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 12:59 am
 
hunka hunka burning SHIT
the King is dead. FUCK elvis.
dontchooknowI...
reigning sound needs to do more elvis songs, they made me like suspicious minds, still i doubt even they could rescue a song like "in the ghetto"
in the ghetto indeed...
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:07 am
 
even though they were the same group who kept a fool like Professor Griff hanging around.

OH yeah - forgot all about this....

good point!
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:08 am
 
I've got two copies of that record for some reason.



Dale - wanna sell it?....how much you want for the extra copy???
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:09 am
 
What would Elvis have done if he'd lived another 30 years.... Hmmmmm. What a great idea for a story.
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:15 am
 
guralnick rules.

Yup.

Elvis is important, aside from his music, for being an early example of the toxicity of modern fame. How it chewed him up and ruined him is detailed in Guralnick's excellent book Careless Love, mentioned in the byline of that article. Even if you aren't an E fan you should check it out, it gives a window into the beginnings of the trainwreck of a culture we've got goin' on now...sure, there's Marilyn Monroe and you could pick your other hundred favorite examples, but Guralnick makes a good case for Elvis as the poster boy/martyr for the destructive quality of celebrity in America...
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:17 am
 
still i doubt even they could rescue a song like "in the ghetto"
in the ghetto indeed...

Ever heard the Candi Staton version? That thing rules!
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 1:21 am
 
huh sounds like a good book
are there any books on later era crazy elvis? that shit seems interesting too
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 2:15 am
 
What would Elvis have done if he'd lived another 30 years.... Hmmmmm. What a great idea for a story.


MAN, that was gay.
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 3:01 am
 
god damn, elvis just gets me all riled up. i'm glad to hear most of you know what's up.
elvis party on hot trash tonite JUST BECAUSE!
www.wcsb.org 11pm-1am est
send favorite elvis song requests!
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 3:52 am | Edited by: Seamus
 
Even if Elvis were a die-in-the-wool racist, what would be wrong with liking him? Miles Davis was a racist but I listen to his music. I love Jerry Lee Lewis, a royal piece of shit and most likely murderer. Chuck Berry is no ethical giant among men. George Jones has the iq of a retard but i put down $50 to go see him.

Fuck people with pious bullshit, attention-seeking moral stands.

Oh, and I think PE stops being interesting or "challenging" soon after puberty is over.
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 4:04 am
 
well it was pretty cool of chuck d to agree to do bring the noise with anthrax...
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 5:13 am | Edited by: dale
 
I've got two copies of that record for some reason.



Dale - wanna sell it?....how much you want for the extra copy???


Maybe. I think at least one of them is that cheap as flexi-plastic Candem/RCA issue. One of them is from my folks collection. It's a fairly common record in these parts actually. There's some shit bag editing on this record. I know that there has been at least a few volumes of totally unedited total narco-E stage banter out there (including the complete "I'm gonna rip their tongue out BY THE ROOTS" rant that 'Having Fun' only hints at)

I'm thinking Dave the Spazz's tribute on Thursday will put "the KIng" in better perpective than any us here have tried so far (well, 'cept for Jack Stands maybe.)
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 3:56 pm
 
wow, i totally played "velvet elvis" by weird al.
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 5:20 pm
 
Fuck people with pious bullshit, attention-seeking moral stands.

those kinda people just can't get laid!
Posted: Aug 15, 2007 11:16 pm
 
elvis played the devils music and is roasting in hell right now
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 4:02 pm
 
Happy Death Day!

Posted: Aug 16, 2007 4:13 pm
 
"A lot of people have accused Elvis of stealing the black man's music, when in fact, almost every black solo entertainer copied his stage mannerisms from Elvis."
Jackie Wilson
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 4:13 pm
 
death at death day as elvis fan dies in the heat outside Graceland.

http://www.commercialappeal.com/mca/local/article/0,2845,MCA_25340_567 4140,00.html
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 4:15 pm
 
"I wasn't just a fan, I was his brother. He said I was good and I said he was good; we never argued about that. Elvis was a hard worker, dedicated, and God loved him. Last time I saw him was at Graceland. We sang Old Blind Barnabus together, a gospel song. I love him and hope to see him in heaven. There'll never be another like that soul brother.
James Brown
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 4:39 pm
 
death at death day as elvis fan dies in the heat outside Graceland.


OH NO! Elvis is seeking his revenge from BEYOND THE GRAVE!!!!!
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 5:08 pm
 
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 5:40 pm
 
you'd listen to recordings of anybody taking a shit though.

Elvis would do it with that certain style.


Yeah, like a black man
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 11:09 pm
 
death at death day as elvis fan dies in the heat outside Graceland.

I told you they should have got rid of those candles...
Posted: Aug 16, 2007 11:32 pm
 
I haven't read this thread all the way because I can't stomach it. I mean, what's the controversy???!!! Elvis a racist? Well, that's just laughable.

Elvis is King. I don't like people that don't like Elvis.
I never thought I'd quote haunted george. Well, why I never thought I'd do that I don't know.

And, thanks Bazooka Joe for posting those quotes from James Brown and Jackie Wilson.

If Elvis was alive today would he come into Goner and buy Eric a cadillac? Would he try to pull a Kung Fu move on Jack Stands for talking shit?
Yes, and yes.
What the hell is wrong with you, Jack Stands?
Posted: Aug 17, 2007 12:36 am
 
Sure, I mean, if your a fan people that become snitches when other bands outsell them and love tickling Nixon's pickle, I'm sure Elvis is perfect...


Racist? Probably not. Whiny tattle-tale that wanted to be a presidential cop? Yep.
Posted: Aug 17, 2007 1:37 am
 
"Elvis was a hero to most but he never meant shit to me hes straight up racist the sucka was simple and plain...muthafuck him and John Wayne!!"
-Chuck D
Posted: Aug 17, 2007 1:46 am
 
and chuck d's NOT a racist? it works both ways.
Posted: Aug 17, 2007 1:46 am
 
skrewdriver werent racist either.
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