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Posted: Oct 16, 2006 3:44 pm
 
Times article on last night's show...I was hoping Television would play a set too...but she did have Richard Lloyd sit in...

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/16/arts/music/16cnd-cbgbnotebook.html?e i=5094&en=903590e7bd503594&hp=&ex=1161057600&adxnnl=1&partner=homepage &adxnnlx=1161009526-ZtR+DoKMCZEog2vkRoCyEQ

Richard Hell's OpEd In the Times this weekend

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/10/14/opinion/14rhell.html
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 5:33 pm
 
that piece by pareles is particularly well-written.
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 5:37 pm
 
"Kids, they'll find some other club," Ms. Smith insisted during her set. "You just got a place, just some crappy place, that nobody wants, and you got one guy who believes in you, and you just do your thing. And anybody can do that, anywhere in the world, any time."

People were dancing in the streets just across from CBGB last night at probably the same time she was saying these lines:

http://flickr.com/photos/pheezy/270925757/
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 9:07 pm
 
Losers like me can't access the oh so exclusive NYTIMES site...maybe you could post the article....?
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 9:09 pm
 
oh so exclusive NYTIMES site

exclusive? just register.
get yourself a dummy hotmail or yahoo account for such things
and then register. its free. and then you can read shit like that all the time...
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 9:47 pm
 
no, when dtrain tries to register they send him back a link to the Post - they know what's up at the Times
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 9:49 pm
 
no shit!
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 9:53 pm
 
Uh...EXCUSE ME???!!

The Post's "page six" rules!
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:08 pm
 
dtrain rules!
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:12 pm
 
Thanks brah!
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:16 pm
 
JUST FOR MIKE....and anyone else who doesn't click or doesn't register

October 16, 2006
A Punk-Rock Institution Closes Its Doors
By JON PARELES

Just after 1 a.m. on Monday morning, the last notes of live music rang from the stage of CBGB & OMFUG, the Bowery club where punk-rock invented itself. Patti Smith finished the club's final concert with her ballad "Elegie," growing teary-eyed as she read a list of dead punk-rock musicians and advocates. But just before it, she had worked up a galvanizing crescendo -- from poetry recitation to rock song to guitar-charged incantation -- in a medley of "Horses" and "Gloria," proclaiming with a triumphant rasp, "Jesus died for somebody's sins/But not for CBGB's."

The songs came from her debut album, "Horses," which was released in 1975, when Ms. Smith and CBGB were making each other famous. She was a poet turned rocker, tapping and then redoubling the energy she found in basic three-chord songs. The club -- its initials mean Country Bluegrass Blues and Other Music for Uplifting Gormandizers -- was a hangout in a dire location. But its owner, Hilly Kristal, agreed to book artistically ambitious, high-concept, generally primitivist bands that defied the commercial imperatives of early-1970's rock. It was a neighborhood place in a low-rent neighborhood that happened to house artists and derelicts side by side, inspiring some hard-nosed art. During her set, Ms. Smith described CBGB as, "This place that Hilly so generously offered to us to create new ideas, to fail, to make mistakes, to reach new heights."

In some ways CBGB, which opened in December 1973, ended its life as it had started. It never moved from its initial location, which was originally under a Bowery flophouse, now a homeless shelter. It never changed its floor plan, with a long bar lit by neon beer signs on the way to an uneven floor, a peeling ceiling, a peculiarly angled stage and notorious bathrooms. Through the years, the sound system was improved until its clean roar could make any power chord sound explosive. Mostly, however, CBGB just grew more encrusted: with dust, with band posters stuck on every available surface, with bodily fluids from performers and patrons. Ms. Smith did some casual spitting of her own during her set.

But in a historical long shot, CBGB got lucky. The concepts of bands booked there turned out to be durable ones: Ms. Smith's blunt, visionary and primal songs; Talking Heads' nervously oblique funk, and especially the Ramones' terse, blaring, catchy rockers, which came to define punk-rock. Having nurtured bands like those--and later post-punk bands from Sonic Youth to Living Colour--CBGB became a rock landmark. Its reputation grew strong enough to coast on. Even as its regular bookings grew far less selective through the 1990's and 2000's, every now and then a big-name band would play there as a pilgrimage.

Yet CBGB remained a neighborhood joint. The club's last show wasn't some stage-managed, all-star sendoff destined to be a television special (although it was broadcast live on Sirius satellite radio.) It was just two sets by Ms. Smith with her band and two guests: Flea, the bassist from the Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Richard Lloyd, one of the two guitarists in Television, the band whose early gigs defined CBGB. Ms. Smith's sets included Television's "Marquee Moon," with Mr. Lloyd, and songs from other CBGB bands: Blondie's hit "The Tide is High," the Dead Boys' "Sonic Reducer" and a Ramones medley sung by her guitarist, Lenny Kaye, who changed the lyrics of "Do You Remember Rock and Roll Radio?" from "It's the end of the century" to "It's the end of CBGB." Ms. Smith was ignoring one of Mr. Kristal's early conditions for CBGB bands--that they only perform their own songs--but forgivably.

Punk-rock never promised that it was built to last. The songs always seemed ready to self-destruct; simple and brief, they were often just three chords and a burst of frustration or pugnacity or humor. Some of the musicians were self-destructive, too. Yet punk, as codified by the Ramones, has turned out to fulfill some perennial adolescent need, and it persisted. Bands kept coming along and embracing it, some lasting just long enough for a few local gigs--and possibly a set on one of CBGB's nightly septuple bills--and others becoming the first step for musicians who would go on to bigger things. Punk infiltrated a suburban underground in the 1980's, created its own do-it-yourself circuit, and eventually emerged as million-selling punk-pop in the 1990's. Improbably, CBGB persisted too: an institution built on music that originally sought to topple institutions.

It's a shame to lose any working club in New York City with so much history and, even rarer, such outstanding sound. The prospect of a recreated CBGB in Las Vegas, even with original artifacts, can't make up for it; Las Vegas isn't in the neighborhood. But CBGB did its job so well it created its own competition and heirs. Bands whose music is based on what came out of CBGB in the 1970's perform everywhere from the Mercury Lounge to Madison Square Garden. The closing of CBGB is the end of a lovable chunk of New York City real estate, but it's far from the end of an era. After a yearlong goodbye--since CBGB's disputes with its landlord, the nonprofit Bowery Residents' Committee, first surfaced in 2005--too much mourning is unnecessary.

"Kids, they'll find some other club," Ms. Smith insisted during her set. "You just got a place, just some crappy place, that nobody wants, and you got one guy who believes in you, and you just do your thing. And anybody can do that, anywhere in the world, any time."

After her set was over and the club had partly cleared out, Ms. Smith returned to the stage for a silent postcript. As fans held up outstretched hands, Ms. Smith reached into a bag and handed out little black pins. They read, "What remains is future."
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:18 pm
 
and here's Hell's op-ed

October 14, 2006
Op-Ed Contributor
Rock 'n' Roll High School
By RICHARD HELL

CBGB'S shuts down this weekend.

There's not too much left to say about the character of the joint. It's the most famous rock 'n' roll club in the world, the most famous that there ever has been, and it's just as famously a horrendous dump. It's the archetypal, the ur, dim and dirty, loud, smelly and ugly nowhere little rock 'n' roll club. There's one not much different from it in every burg in the country.

Only, like a lot of New York, CBGB's is more so, way more so. And of course, for three or four years in the mid-70's, it housed the most influential cluster of bands ever to grow up or to implicitly reject the concept of growing up under one roof.

On practically any weekend from 1974 to 76 you could see one or more of the following groups (here listed in approximate chronological order) in the often half-empty 300-capacity club: Television, the Ramones, Suicide, the Patti Smith Group, Blondie, the Dictators, the Heartbreakers, Talking Heads, Richard Hell and the Voidoids, and the Dead Boys. Not to mention some often equally terrific (or equally pathetic) groups that aren't as well remembered, like the Miamis and the Marbles and the Erasers and the Student Teachers. Nearly all the members of these bands treated the club as a headquarters as home. It was a private world. We dreamed it up. It flowered out of our imaginations.

How often do you get to do that? That's what you want as a kid, and that's what we were able to do at CBGB's. It makes me think of that Elvis Presley quotation: "When I was a child, ladies and gentlemen, I was a dreamer. I read comic books, and I was the hero of the comic book. I saw movies, and I was the hero in the movie. So every dream I ever dreamed has come true a hundred times." We dreamed CBGB's into existence.

The owner of the club, Hilly Kristal, never said no. That was his genius. Though it's dumb to use the word genius about what happened there. It was all a dream. Many of us were drunk or stoned half our waking hours, after all. The thing is, we were young there. You don't get that back. Even children know that. They don't want their old stuff thrown away. Everything should be kept. I regret everything I've ever thrown away.

CBGB's was like a big playhouse, site of conspiracies, orgies, delirium, refuge, boredom, meanness, jealousy, kindness, but most of all youth. Things felt and done the first time are more vivid. CBGB's is where many things were felt with that vividness. That feeling is the real identity of the club, to me. And it's horrible, or at least seriously sad, to lose it. But then, apparently, we aren't really going to lose it.

CBGB's is going to be dismantled and reconstructed as an exhibit in Las Vegas, like Elvis. I like that. A lot. I really hope it happens as intended.

It's occurred to me that Hilly's genius passivity is something he has in common with Andy Warhol. Another trait of Warhol's was that he fanatically tried to keep or record everything that ever happened in his vicinity, from junk mail in "time capsules" to small talk to newspaper front pages and movie star publicity shots to 24 hours of the Empire State Building.

We all know that nothing lasts. But at least we can make a cool and funny exhibit of it.

I'm serious. God likes change and a joke. God loves CBGB's.

Richard Hell, a musician, is the author of the novel "Godlike" and the film critic for BlackBook magazine.
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:24 pm
 
Thanks. Nothing with me clicks or registers anymore. Old age I guess...

HAWW!
Posted: Oct 16, 2006 10:27 pm
 
Or you can install bugmenot (http://www.bugmenot.com/) as a plugin to your Firefox browser. With BugMeNot, any time you hit a major free news site that you have to login to, right mouse click, and bugmenot fetches a known working user/pass combo from it's database for you to use. It's a super nice Firefox plugin.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 12:18 am
 
and bugmenot fetches a known working user/pass combo from it's database for you to use. It's a super nice Firefox plugin.

you mean, theoretically, if someone wants to log on to the NYTImes online, and they have bugmenot, they might be using MY user ID? does that mean they can email articles to people and it looks like its coming from me???
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 2:18 am
 
Maybe now when you're walkin' down Bowery you won't have to push through that thick line of little 5 ft. mohawks and wonder, "do these 12 year old's parents know where they are?"

Also looks like we'll get those brats now here in Vegas. They're supposedly in negotiation on this building downtown here right now.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:10 am
 
you mean, theoretically, ... they might be using MY user ID?

No, the bug me not people maintain a db of user submitted known working user/passes. Unless you submitted your user name and pass, it won't be on bugmenot.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:13 am
 
so, if you are a good samaritan and want to help people like dtrain for instance, you submit your user name/password to bugmenot?

what's the incentive?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:16 am
 
Nothing to see here. We're not tracking anything.

Move along.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:19 am
 
what's the incentive?

Information wants to be free, that's the incentive.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:21 am
 
Yes. Yes, what he said.

There are no black helicopters. Move along.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:28 am | Edited by: Dubya
 
they might be using MY user ID? does that mean they can email articles to people and it looks like its coming from me???

Heh heh heh.
Well ...ya haven't got anything to worry about as long as you're a freedom lovin' Amurican who we don't deem to be an "enemy combatant". You know what I'm sayin'?
Until we suspend "habitus corpsius" there's not a thing we can do to ya.
Hell, were havin' a hard enough time just tryin' to cut veteran's benefits and Medi-care.
Heh heh.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:35 am
 
Information wants to be free,
yeah - but my email gets spoofed plenty as it is....
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 6:54 am
 
Or you can install bugmenot

yo, this work on pay porn sites or just new junk. aka loser junk?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 7:37 am
 
so i was told that it's reopening in las vegas. i can totally see cbgb going corporate ala house of blues. don't tell me it won't happen.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 3:27 pm
 
Or you can install bugmenot

yo, this work on pay porn sites or just new junk. aka loser junk?


Sometimes.

It also sometimes works on Myspace, so you can log in as some kid you never heard of.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 4:40 pm
 
Also looks like we'll get those brats now here in Vegas. They're supposedly in negotiation on this building downtown here right now.

There is also going to be an Emo's franchise in Vegas. I shit you not.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 4:48 pm
 
didn't Las Vegas go on record as wanting to be a tourist destination for families... oh, maybe 10-15 years ago?

i couldn't believe my eyes when i was in vegas in 1994 (for work) and it was like disneyland... time before, i was there in 1982 and it was still wonderfully sleazy and still quite individual

hey bazooka -- how long and during what time did you live in vegas? did you see it go from individual sleaze to "corporate/gentrified"? what do the locals and natives think?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:16 pm
 
YEah I was there for the "growth." By the time I was just out of high school it was realy getting underway. I was too young to appreciate the good stuff when it was around. I think most poeple my age and slightly older are horrified by the gentrification but people my parents age are really happy with it, although they will actually tell you that Vegas was safer when the mob was in power. The new young'uns there are oblivious to anything being legitimately hip.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 5:46 pm | Edited by: red eyed willie
 
so i was told that it's reopening in las vegas. i can totally see cbgb going corporate ala house of blues. don't tell me it won't happen.

Not so far. Not that I much care either, but right now they're talking about an old downtown storefront location right near the Beauty Bar, which opened here [Vegas] last year. I doubt that Hilly Kristal has the money for an expensive lease in a casino.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 6:14 pm
 
I doubt that Hilly Kristal has the money for an expensive lease in a casino.

probably not for an expensive lease on a casino BUT i would venture to guess that he could actually open a CBGB in vegas by licensing the NAME to a casino and actually GET MONEY instead of spending it.... and he could manage/operate it or set himself up to collect a healthy revenue stream w/o doing a whole lot of actual work or spending any money of his own...( don't know who here is from FLA or remembers "Woody's on the Beach" in south beach before the south beach revival -- a club promoter paid Ronnie Wood $$ to use his name and gave him a venue in which to do stuff... $ in exchange for name/likeness and tacit endorsement)

in any event - CBGB in a strip casino would SUCK in my opinion - and if they are going to open in old downtown vegas, well hell, THAT is cool

what i don't understand is that the CBGB merch business is huge - i'd also venture to guess that hilly could have bought the building at 315 bowery many times over already just with his income from merch money alone

BAZOOKA - what your folks said about vegas being safer when the mob was in power.... i always felt that way about my old neighborhood in little italy.... my building was next door to the ravenite social club and gotti was always hanging out and knew everyone who lived on the street and who was supposed to be there. i always felt safe there, coming home at 5 AM or whatever... now that the street is all gentrified, i'm glad i don't live there
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 6:47 pm
 
I kinda knew this thread would end up about CBs Vegas...but I really just posted to share a couple interesting articles about the end of an era. Did anyone go to the Patti show? I wanted to, but figured it would be impossible to get in, Sunday, tired, blah blah...was hoping for a Television gig...
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 6:56 pm
 
was hoping for a Television gig...

unless its purely for cash, verlaine and lloyd don't play together

i think it was pretty sweet that richard played w/ patti

was hoping to be in NYC for this, but as always... needy clients made me change my entire month's plans....

and i repeat tom's question: ANYONE GO?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 7:04 pm
 
Information wants to be free,
yeah - but my email gets spoofed plenty as it is....


People can register with their own dummy hotmail account that they are never going to check so they don't care about it getting spammed, and then give the login to bugmenot. A nice simple way of letting some people have a bit more anonimity.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 7:06 pm | Edited by: leftpeg
 
Just curious. How old is Hilly anyway?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 7:50 pm
 
How old is Hilly anyway?

he's in his 70s
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 9:12 pm | Edited by: red eyed willie
 
he could actually open a CBGB in vegas by licensing the NAME to a casino and actually GET MONEY instead of spending it....

That's a possibility, but not as likely as it used to be. Vegas has become a lot more popular and more expensive in the last five years. Leasing arrangements here have changed and are no longer loaded with the incentives one would have found here in the '90s. I hope for CB's sake that they do go downtown 'cause it's less expensive (for now) and it's going to pop 'soon as they clean it up some.

I kinda knew this thread would end up about CBs Vegas...

I live here so I have an excuse.
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 9:20 pm
 
The only time I went to there in New York was for a "10th anniversary of Johnny Thunders' death" show. It sucked. I kinda feel like the "era" ended many years before CBGBs. I mean hell, it outlived all but one Ramone. That's good enough, ain't it?
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 9:41 pm
 
God I wish I could have been there for the Patti Smith show. Fuck. I was obsessed with Horses for months when I was 19...
Posted: Oct 17, 2006 10:13 pm
 
It's cool, Sherry posts every now and again.
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