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Goner Message Board / ???? / Teens embrace vintage vinyl, resist corporate control of music industry
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:53 am
 
Take those old records off the shelf
Apr 20/06 (updated Apr 25)
by Jenny Hall (about) (email)

Listening to records - the old-fashioned vinyl discs long believed to have been made obsolete by CDs and music downloading is a form of resistance against the music industry's corporate taste-makers for many young people, according to new research from David Hayes, a PhD candidate at the Ontario Institute >for Studies in Education of U of T.


His thesis, entitled Making Music Meaningful: Youth Investment in Popular Music, focused on how young people in the pseudonymous town of Mapleville, Ont., gleaned meaning from popular music and how their choice of music helped them navigate gender and racial identities.

While conducting his research, Hayes was surprised to discover that many of the young music fans he was interviewing were fans of vinyl. "This made me wonder why they were interested in something that is for all intents and purposes a dead medium," he says. These young people were not connected to DJ culture but had switched from buying CDs to collecting LPs, often seeking out obscure recordings.

In multiple interviews, Hayes' research subjects said they liked the visual appeal of LP jackets and the act of scouring shops and conventions for hard-to-find releases. They overwhelmingly insisted that the sound quality of LPs was superior to that of modern formats and characterized LPs and the artists of the past as more authentic than the barrage of youth-oriented music being aggressively marketed at them today.

In a paper published in the February 2006 issue of Popular Music and Society, Hayes stated that though these reasons for preferring LPs were important, it was the physical interaction required by an LP the need to gently place a needle on a record, to flip the record and to care for it that really engaged his subjects. Indeed, he says, their "active involvement in negotiating the pops, skips and crackles endemic to most second-hand records" was essential to the experience and lent the music an air of authenticity.

Worlds away from rural Mapleville, Hayes works in Toronto's Jane and Finch neighbourhood as a Grade 10 and 12 English teacher. "Popular music is so important to young people but it's often ignored or derided by their parents and by authority figures."

Hayes argues that an affection for vinyl is liberating for the young people he studied and helps them mark themselves as different from their peers as they reject the music industry's attempts to define what's popular and to regulate format. Their preferences are a form of resistance: "Through their retrogressive tastes and practices, these youth effectively disrupt the music industry's efforts to define and regulate their consumer identities."

Contact:

David Hayes, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto e-mail: dhayes@oise.utoronto.ca, 416-526-6338 or 416-466-5754
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:56 am
 
these youth effectively disrupt the music industry's efforts to define and regulate their consumer identities

only to have marketing firms exploit this very trend shortly after discovering its existence.
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:59 am | Edited by: invictus
 
What a bunch of crap. It's not resistance to try to catch on to something that these trendy fucktards were missing out on the first time around while they were busy listening to Destiny's Child and Limp Biskit.
Posted: May 16, 2006 9:35 am
 
yeah..and distros are charging big bucks for that lp on wax..
Posted: May 16, 2006 1:48 pm
 
its because theyre better for rolling doobies on, duh
Posted: May 16, 2006 3:05 pm
 
i've done more coke off of CD's than i've rolled doobies off of LP's...
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:30 pm
 
Ummm you can buy Saves The Day, Hot Hot Heat, etc. on vinyl. The record companies know some dorks still buy vinyl, so they still press records. Anybody ever been to a record store? Yeah. I dunno how buying something on wax as oppossed to CD helps disrupt the record industry, but go on with your bad selves, kids.
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:35 pm
 
I saw christina auguilera and blink182 vinyl on ebay, I didn't understand.
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:37 pm
 
I saw christina auguilera and blink182 vinyl on ebay, I didn't understand.

I bet it doesn't sound any better.
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:40 pm
 
I saw christina auguilera and blink182 vinyl on ebay, I didn't understand.

what's not to understand?

The record companies know some dorks still buy vinyl, so they still press records.

i prefer vinyl because i like my record cover art to be 12"x12" and gatefold if possible
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:40 pm
 
Aw let em have their fun, is it skin off your nose that they like crap music?
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:44 pm
 
what's not to understand?
I don't expect people like that to even know that music can be played on vinyl.
Posted: May 16, 2006 5:52 pm
 
I would venture to bet that at least 75% of teens have parents with a collection of vinyl that they still hold onto or have gotten rid of while the kids were old enough to have asked what it was. I have bought stereo equipment here in town from the least likely of places in the burbs where these men have fancy basement audio rooms with at least one turntable. One of these dads had a MASSIVE and killer 80's soul, disco, rap and r&b collection in his garage...his wife would not let him keep in the house and he won't sell.
Posted: May 16, 2006 6:01 pm
 
killer 80's soul, disco, rap and r&b collection

What, like the Gap Band?
Posted: May 16, 2006 6:38 pm
 
Cameo, BarKays, Prince, Midnight Star. Planet Patrol, UTFO, Afrikka Bambaatta, Treacherous Three, Schooly D, Brass Construction and yes, the GAP BAND, funny man.
Posted: May 16, 2006 6:44 pm
 
Well, are they talking about kids that buy new shit on vinyl, OR are they talking about the hipster youngsters who are trying to buy instant street cred on ebay by paying $45 for 7"s I paid $2 for when I saw the band on tour in '96?

I assumed they were talking about the latter. These are the same fucktards that will pay $40 for a ripped up Whitesnake t-shirt.
Posted: May 16, 2006 6:46 pm
 
Boy David Hayes really has his pulse on youth culture. Aside from the downloading mention this article could've been written 10-15 years ago. I guess record collecting has gained popularity, but one reason I started buying vinyl was the fact that it would always be $1-$2 cheaper than the c.d. version. He doesn't mention that way of stickin' it to the man. I don't see how paying $20 for the 180gram l.p. would be a liberating experience.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:09 pm | Edited by: fierydrunk
 
I assumed they were talking about the latter. These are the same fucktards that will pay $40 for a ripped up Whitesnake t-shirt.

Whoa whoa, invictus! This is not the attitude you were preaching about in another thread! I know you aren't at work, but hey now. Kids are kids...they get a free pass pretty much to be stupid. Everyone is going to call them stupid anyway.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:15 pm
 
Stupid kids.

There. I did it.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:18 pm
 
I almost paid $30 for a vintage Memphis State 1985 Final Four Souvenir t on eBay. Would have been worth every last penny.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:20 pm
 
I dunno younger peeps record collections usually go down like this:

1.) 56 "ironic" thrift store finds (Flock of Seagulls, Duran Duran, etc) with two decent, newly purchased punk or indie rock records shoved to the front of the pile to make it look like they have a real collection

or

2.) A few (30-40) decent (Ramones, Misfits, nothing that great) records, NO TURNTABLE to play them on and only there for looks. If they do have a turntable it's a Fischer Price dealy...

there's my rant.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:22 pm
 
To me, that was one of the hugest drawbacks of being a teenager. You actually don't know shit, even if you're smart, and there's no shortage of adults around to remind you that you don't know shit.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:23 pm
 
Stupid adults.

There. I did it.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:23 pm
 
OK, devils advocate here, how cool were you when you were a teenager? Was this your M.O.? I admit doing similar shit thinking I was going to impress someone that might just happen to come into my 9th grade bedroom. I refuse to hate on this. It is kinda cute--but in reality, they cause much eye-rolling, I admit.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:23 pm
 
I highly support this method of resistance. By all means, buy some records! Buy them at Goner. Buy them at Passout. It doesn't matter where..just be sure to get them before they get you! RESIST!
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:26 pm
 
OK, devils advocate here, how cool were you when you were a teenager?
Shiiiiiit! I still ain't cool.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:42 pm
 
No one on this board, or a very few, are so "cool" that they haven't ever in their adult life been self-conscious enough to think about what someone was gonna think of them based on their clothes, their hair or their music/book collection. Come on now.
Posted: May 16, 2006 7:59 pm
 
Whoa whoa, invictus! This is not the attitude you were preaching about in another thread! I know you aren't at work, but hey now. Kids are kids...they get a free pass pretty much to be stupid. Everyone is going to call them stupid anyway.

I actually AM at work. But yeah, how am I contradicting myself? I place a greater social value on people who aren't sucker fools, riding the tide too late and getting taken on ebay for crap that they could have had for less if they weren't busy being posers.

Our customers aren't sucker fools.
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:04 pm
 
I still have my records from when I was a tween - before them there CD's were all the rage.

Then when I got older and started "collecting" artists, if they had something out on vinyl , I would buy it to be a completist.

Then I learned that wasted money on rare music is better spent on trips to Amsterdam.
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:21 pm
 
i really dont believe teens are resisting corporate control of the music industry. maybe some, but there wouldnt be much of a music industry without teens
Posted: May 16, 2006 8:28 pm
 
Stupid teens.

There. I did it.
Posted: May 16, 2006 9:31 pm
 
Stupid teens.

There. I did it.


Once is funny, twice is annoying and three times is a spanking, young man.
Posted: May 16, 2006 9:33 pm
 
Stupid young man.

There. I did...

Hey, wait...
Posted: May 16, 2006 9:35 pm
 
All is forgiven
Posted: May 16, 2006 10:52 pm
 
what's not to understand?
I don't expect people like that to even know that music can be played on vinyl.


SOME REALLY TRENDY-POP CLUB DJS SPIN THIS SHIT, CHRISTINA AGUUULARIA AN WHAT NOT. EVERY POP STAR HAS THEIR FREAK CULT TYPE FOLLOWING WHO WILL BUY WHATEVER THEY CAN IN ANY FORMAT. WHETHER THEY OWN A TURNTABLE IS UNKNOWN. I DON'T CARE EITHER WAY.
Posted: May 16, 2006 10:54 pm
 
there are the people who buy vinyl because they feel cool (frat boys laughing in the record store "DUUUuuDe! Huey Lewis on vinyl! WHAA, I should totaly buy this dude!"

and then

There is the "I am down with the scene record buyers"
then there is me, who cannot afford cds.
Posted: May 16, 2006 11:11 pm
 
how am I contradicting myself?

Invictus, please do not trip. You sounded/sound kinda contradictory when you call some kid a "sucker fool" or a "fucktard" for spending a lot of $$$ on something rare that hey, they really might want. How do we know what their intentions are? You said your customers get some real rare original stuff they've been waiting eons for at your shop and they are made happy by it. You also said that you and your staff don't make people that come in the shop feel like fools for asking questions and trying to learn about new stuff. I think that is all kids are trying to do and some of them just have a tad more cash to play with. Not to say that some of them don't act like silly fools, but again, we are talking about teenagers here.

I am sure your customers are stand up ladies and gents.
Posted: May 17, 2006 12:05 am
 
Was DJing a few weeks ago at The Spitz in London, and some 17-18-year-olds were hanging about as I was setting up - "Whatcha got in the box, then?" was the question, and they referred to the 7"s a "vinyls" (yup, with an s) and asked, straightfaced, where you could "still get vinyls" ... Bizarre ...

However, me and our bassist went up to the London Guitar Fair the other week (total shite, incidentally, but cheap strings), and I hepped some teen kid to some kool R&B stuff in the rekkid fair area - he was piling up really obscure stuff at $50 a pop, yet he'd never heard of Frank Frost or Ted Taylor's Rambling Rose ...

I think that, if kids are buying vinyl again, it's because the format (shape, art, price, heft, smell, the vendors, the search - the whole kit'n'kaboodle) puts the music in an identifiable context, which is summat that's in short supply these days ... I mean, you kin get anything you want nowadays, but who do you believe when you want to buy summat? Your online forum, like Goner or any list, or a 'zine, or yer pals, but the traditional (i.e. what it was always s'posed to be abooot, but rarely was, Meltzer was right to retire from music journalism in '72 or thereabouts) press/media don't consider owt outside the 'accepted' canon of musical greats to be that worthy (why have a 'new' and 'reissues' section, when if you've never heard it, it's ALL new and equally valid) so kids are largely deprived of the shit which you hoard and refer to for context and confirmation of your own, rapidly forming taste - how many of you fuckers have a big-ass pile of 70s rock mags and fanzines which you constantly refer to, sometimes 20 years after you first got 'em? THAT's the kinda context that kids are missing, if they're interested in music, not just wallflower, passive consumers of it ...

Will kids buying vinyl generate a revolution? No ...
Posted: May 17, 2006 12:13 am
 
I was an elitist snot for far too long--it isn't fair and it makes you look like and feel like a miserable fuck. Posing is one thing, being born late is another. I would be psyched for some kid to want to buy my Conflict or Blue Persuasion (or old Giant Robot even!!!!) zines. Not that I'm selling, mind you, but I think it is awesome when people are TRYING. Some people are asshats but others are just uncomfortable weird kids that come off like asshats.
Posted: May 17, 2006 12:21 am
 
I think it's great if kids are buying vinyl - so what if some of them are asses, I probably was at their ago, too ... One of the greatest things I ever did was sell some 14-year-old dude his first MC5 album, that Babes In Arms comp, and he was so fucking stoked, and he came back quite a few other times, going like "Have you got any Kinks records? Which one should I buy?" That was GREAT ...
Posted: May 17, 2006 12:26 am
 
I thank the many older peeps who introduced me to stuff when I was a young new wave snot! Talk about poseur--jesus christ. It was fun though...I relished being called "Martha Quinn", must say.
Posted: May 17, 2006 1:20 am | Edited by: Stagger Lee
 
I think it would be awesome if kids started buying vinyl again.

But then I see that my favourite stores around town, who used to have racks of 45's and EPs for sale, now might have a shoe box full of seven inches for sale.

So, ergo, vis a vis, that article is complete bullshit.
Posted: May 17, 2006 2:52 am
 
"Through their retrogressive tastes and practices, these youth effectively disrupt the music industry's efforts to define and regulate their consumer identities."
Projecting a little Mr Hayes?
I'm guessing 'Teach' lives in the pseudonymous town of Mapleville, Ont. because there's no way he does more than show up for work in Toronto's Jane and Finch neighbourhood, or he just might have something more interesting to say about youth "navigat(ing) gender and racial identities. The guy's teaching High School in one of the most fucked up and multi-racial areas of Toronto, and yet he's creaming himself over some rural (read: white) kids spinning thrift shop records. He then gets props for his "research". This would be kinda funny, if it wasn't so typical.
Posted: May 17, 2006 3:15 am
 
I always get my vinyl (brand new, from weird Euro and Japanese labels) shipped to work cuz I don't want it to warp in the heat of my front porch, and the boomers with 17-year-old kids are always shocked to see it.

I figure this article is of a piece with the kids wearing Pink Floyd and Led Zep t-shirts. Kids nowadays want their folks to think they're cool, and parents want their kids to think they're cool. It's all pretty bizarre to me ...
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