Goner Message Board
 | Forums | Register | Reply | Search | Statistics | Manual |
Goner Message Board / ???? / Alienation as a literary device?
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:33 pm
 
I just finished rereading Frankenstien for the third time and still find myself obsessed with this story. I spot read my favorite parts because I dont need the preface of the first 3 chapters anymore. Huck Finn, The Egnigma of Kasper Hauser all great stories of alienation. what are some other good titles? I know there is a ton.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:45 pm
 
Chris Alienation, what do you have to say about this?
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:46 pm
 
amerika - franz kafka
NfU - Dostoyevsky
nausea - satre

i'm sure there's a few million others.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:54 pm
 
well, Dracula is a good classic read. Esp. if you like Frankenstein.

Edith Wharton and Henry James have a plethora of titles, all suitably addressing some character's alienation or distance/clash with society, except that I don't like either author - but they are classics

Portrait of the Lady
Wings of the Dove
both by James are probably the least offensive (to me), your mileage may vary.

Richard Ford is a good contemporary writer you might like
I think one can do no wrong with Martin Amis, esp The London Fields, Money, The Information - all very dark - with protagonists who have complicated inner lives, thoroughly alienated although completely ensconsed in their milieu.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:55 pm
 
I'm blanking on NFU. More details to jar my memory.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:56 pm
 
Dead Babies thats Amis right?
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 9:57 pm
 
'Seventeen' by Kenzaburo Oe is a good one.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:12 pm
 
Dead Babies thats Amis right?

yes... oh and Time's Arrow (narrative goes backwards) is another good one
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:19 pm
 
"Portnoy's Complaint"- Phillip Roth
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:22 pm
 
by nabokov

LOLITA
DESPAIR - which reminds me all the time of dostoevsky's THE DOUBLE
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:30 pm
 
I was actually gonna read Portnoy's Complaint soon, is it good? The back of it looked like it would be entertaining.


I thought this thread was called "Alliteration as a literary device".
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:32 pm
 
I guess you ain't got no business reading then.

Ummm... Norah... did you see???
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:34 pm
 
I dont like to juggle books but read one through and then begin another so I think Dead Babies will be my next read. I need to stop rereading shit and start something new. I must say that the last book recomended to me was The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon, and I was so disappointed. So many books take place ww2 era occupation and the whole being a jew and the struggle and hardship. Is become fodder. I understand things were hard for the jews during ww2 and things were hard for americans during the deppresion but the story has been told and it doesn't hold the same weight. I guess thats why I didn't like the Chabon novel. It seemed trite. Thats just my opinion though.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:34 pm
 
I dont like to juggle books but read one through and then begin another so I think Dead Babies will be my next read. I need to stop rereading shit and start something new. I must say that the last book recomended to me was The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay by Michael Chabon, and I was so disappointed. So many books take place ww2 era occupation and the whole being a jew and the struggle and hardship. Is become fodder. I understand things were hard for the jews during ww2 and things were hard for americans during the deppresion but the story has been told and it doesn't hold the same weight. I guess thats why I didn't like the Chabon novel. It seemed trite. Thats just my opinion though.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:40 pm
 
I was actually gonna read Portnoy's Complaint soon, is it good?

It's probably my favorite book. It's hilarious. Some of it is so close to my own childhood that it's scary.
Posted: Jan 6, 2006 10:54 pm
 
ugggh richard ford is the worst. I slogged through 2 of his and hated em, met him at a party and he was a total ass... basically on the "get drunk, get laid" speaking tour, which will surely be parodied by CHristopher Guest in an upcoming film.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:26 am
 
"Ham on Rye" by Bukowski is my current fave. That's about as good a look at youthfull alienation as any.

Most J.D. Salinger shit, obviously. Almost all of "Nine Stories" and of course "Catcher" deal with an alienated male character. Even if the character is already dead a la "Uncle Wiggly".

"Paul's Case" by Willa Cather.

"Jude The Obscure" by Hardy.

This list could continue into infinity, especially with modern lit. stuff.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:27 am
 
Oh yeah, most drug-culture shit like "Junky" and "The Basketball Diaries" focuses on alienation from society, to some extent. Or at least how drug addiction can bring you to the darker fringes of it.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:31 am
 
"Dude, where's my car" - the protagonists have to endure an Homeric journey in search of their car. It reminded me a lot of the Odyssey. As far as alienation goes, there's some hot alien chicks in that movie!
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:33 am
 
ps- what is "Despair" about? I've never read anything besides "Lolita". I could google this but I'm just making convo.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:37 am
 
Ham on Rye is great. There is a moment in that book where he describes peoples feet underneath the kitchen table. POV memory of when he was still crawling... I swear I have that same memory. It has to be my first memory, unless I somehow fabricated it and have it confused with an a more recent memory or a dream.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 2:43 am
 
I understand things were hard for the jews during ww2 and things were hard for americans during the deppresion but the story has been told and it doesn't hold the same weight.

Both of these topics have been written about ad nauseum, but I'm sure there's still good works to come regarding both of them. Those topics aren't dead. There's just not that many writers coming up with good stories about those topics, just as there's not many writers coming up with good stories about any single topic. Just because someone writes about an important topic does NOT mean that the work s/he creates will also be important.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 3:07 am
 
start off with "The Crying of Lot 49" by Pynchon

talk about conspiracy theory!

all his books have characters that grow out of alienation

and move into social sci fi with Philip K Dick
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 3:17 am
 
Agreed HJ. Making an important event in history the backdrop to a story about anything other than the event itself seems to be a sure fire way to add false dramatic flair. Take any story told in the Ghettos of Warsaw and transplant it to the suburbs of east orange New Jersey and depending on the narrator, you still have a story of struggle. Really awful comparatively but you see my point.
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 3:39 am
 
I like The Paranoids in that book!
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 3:43 am
 
comic book???
Posted: Jan 7, 2006 3:56 am
 
"the crying of lot 49" i didnt know what the fuck was going on half the time but it had a band in it that were funny. As for alienation The Hulk is pretty alienated. He has to leave town every week. And Spiderman. Spiderman is a Jewish superhero - Pete Spiderman
Top
Your Reply Click this icon to move up to the quoted message
 

 
Only registered users are allowed to post here. Please, enter your username/password details upon posting a message, or register first.

 
  Goner Message Board Powered by PHP Forum Software miniBB ®